THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

April 2, 2015

 

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NEWS!

Christians remember sacrifice of God's Son on their behalf

J.D. Power tour in Superior

Open house planned at Superior East

County population continues to decline

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The Superior Express & Jewell County News 2 April 2015

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Christians remember sacrifice of God's Son on their behalf

For Christians this is a special week known by many as Holy Week. It begins with the triumphal entry of Jesus into Jerusalem. The Hebrew occupants of the ancient Mid-Eastern city longed for the promised Messiah but they misunderstood the reason for God's son to come to earth to live as a man for a time. They expected the Messiah would overturn the Romans and become an earthly king. On the day we now call Palm Sunday they welcomed him triumphantly into their capital city of Jerusalem. The palm branches they waived were a form of rebel flag. A symbol of their opposition to the Roman oppressors.
The establishment saw Jesus as a threat to the comfortable status quo. By Friday they had manipulated charges and the Romans agreed to put Jesus to death on a cross. While Jesus was hanging on the cross, paying the price for our sins, the earth was cloaked in darkness. But on Sunday Jesus arouse from the grave.
Beginning on Monday of this week and continuing through Friday, Superior churches are sponsoring a series of prayer breakfast meetings with lay speakers. Other special services are being planned this week including sunrise services on Sunday morning.
It has been a long standing tradition of this newspaper to feature a church or religious observance in the issue of The Express published nearest to Easter. This year we feature the Stockholm Church and Swedish Cemetery located southwest of Shickley.
The white church with tall steeple located in the country south of Highway 74 is visible for miles around. A Nebraska Historical Society marker located along Highway 74 tells the history of the church and cemetery located across the fields to the south.
Earlier this spring The Express photographer detoured off Highway 74, stopped to look at the church and walk through the adjoining cemetery. Access to the church from the west is gained via a minimum maintenance road. The road is level and wide and has some gravel but in nearly flat Clay and Fillmore counties it appears it may be subject to water problems during a wet season.
In 1871 a group of Swedish immigrants who had settled in Illinois heard about homesteads and land available at a reasonable price in Nebraska. A representative, Nils Anderson, was sent to scout the area. He was impressed with the agricultural possibilities. He influenced other Swedes to come to the area.
Anderson devised a plan to send to Sweden and offer to pay the immigrants' ship fare in return for work on his and other farms. He became known as Squire Anderson.
In 1850 the number of Swedes in Nebraska was 50. By 1880 the number had grown to 28,000.
As the Swedish settlement grew, it was natural to establish a religious center. On Dec. 28, 1875, a meeting was held at the O.G. Bergquist home and the Stockholm Lutheran Church was established as an official congregation of the Augustana Synod. The members met in homes or schools until the first church was built in 1881.
The membership grew and in 1893 confirmed 20 young people.
On July 30, 1900, it was decided to build a new church. The new church was 36 feet by 60 feet. The total cost was $3,549.46. The architect was A. K. Aldrich of Galesburg, Ill. The contractor was A. A. Gustafson of Funk. The building wasn't officially finished until January, 1901, but an Advent service was held in the almost completed building in December, 1900.
Original plans called for a gable roof with gable returns sheated in wood shingles. Today the wood shingles have been replaced with metal shingles. The church displays Gothic Revival detailing in the arched windows and door openings. The central bell tower displays a belfry with dormer ventilator units. The original 1,800 pound bell still hangs in the belfry. The belfry tower with a gilded metal cross stands 70 feet above ground and can be seen for miles.
Inside features include a raised chancel and wooden Gothic altar. Behind the altar is an original oil painting by Olof Grafstom, "Christ at Gethsemane." The interior walls are covered by the original pressed tin. Part of the 1881 church building was attached to the rear of the new building and serves as a social room. The church is known for its excellent acoustics.
It was vandalized in 1987 and the original pews destroyed. Replacement pews of a similar design were acquired.
A new brick foundation was completed in 2000.
The adjoining cemetery dates to 1878 when the church leadership decided to form a separate entity known as the Swedish Cemetery Association. The church deeded 5 acres to the cemetery association. The cemetery property is to the east and north of the church.
It was with the foresight that sustained the original settlers that in 1948 a collection was made and an adjoining 80 acres were purchased. The intent was for the rents to be used for the upkeep of the cemetery. Today the well-cared-for cemetery has concrete surfaced drives.

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J.D. Power tour in Superior

The J. D. Power Neighborhood tour is coming to the Superior Ace Hardware Store this afternoon (Thursday). Special activities are planned from 1 to 5 p.m.
The J.D. Power truck and trophies will be on display outside the store. There will be free hot dogs, face painting and taste samples along with a 20 percent off bag sale.

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Open house planned at Superior East
The Express was notified late Tuesday afternoon that the Aurora Cooperative and CHS, partners in the development known as Superior East, will hold special event and open house at the new Superior East grain elevator starting at 1:30 p.m. today (Thursday).
Those making comments will be George Hohwieler, president chief executive officer of Aurora Cooperative, Lynden Johnson, business solutions executive vice president of CHS, Bill Schuster, Aurora Cooperative board chairman, a representative of the BNSF railroad and Sonia Schmidt, mayor of Superior.
Superior East, LLC, was formed under the recently introduced CHS Partnered Equity Program. This first-of-its-kind program allows CHS owners to unlock a portion of their equity in CHS to provide capital for an expansion project. Cooperatives participating in the program use a portion of their CHS equity as a contribution to a venture with CHS focused on helping their cooperative grow. Eligible projects include shuttle loaders, fertilizer hub plants and energy assets.
Superior East, LLC is a 50/50 joint venture with a governing board comprised of representatives from both CHS and the Aurora Cooperative. The multiplex is operated by the Aurora Cooperative.
Facility tours will be available after the formal presentations.

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County population continues to decline
It didn't come as a surprise but the latest population estimates prepared by the U.S. Census burea shows the population of most rural Nebraska counties including Nuckolls continues to decline.
The population is thought to have declined 26 between the estimates made in 2014 and 2013. The 2014 estimated was 4,369. In 2012 it was 4,395 which was down from 4,431 in 2012. The official census found 4,507 people living in Nuckolls County in 2010. The 2011 estimate dropped this number to 4,451.
Webster County is thought to have declined from 3,814 in the 2010 to 3,658 in 2014. Clay County has declined from 6,542 in 2010 to 6,315 in 2014.
Thayer County is bucking the trend, showing an estimated increase between 2010 and 2014. The population is thought to have grwon from 5,218 in 2010 to 5,230 in 2014.

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