THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

Nov. 20, 2014

 

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NEWS!

Ideal Market installs new check-out stations

Money available for repair of tainter gates at Harlan

Declining mail service presents Thanksgiving week challenges

Another chapter of Nuckolls County history closed in 1939

The Cyber Express-Record

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The Superior Express 20 November 2014

THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS and JEWELL CO NEWS Complete Editions Pages

NEBRASKA ELECTION RESULTS NOVEMBER 2014

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Ideal Market installs new check-out stations

There is change in the air at Superior's Ideal Market and it's not just the holiday food products which have appeared. Shannon and Jenny McCord, operators of the store, have made a significant change at the checkout area. Four new counters have replaced the former checkout counters which were installed by Russell McCord in the early 1960s. The conveyor mechanisms on the old units were breaking down and they had reached the end of their working life expectancy.
The planning for the replacement of the units has been a 10 year project which has now come to fruition. Shannon McCord related it took two nights of work, to the early hours of the morning, after the store was closed, to remove the old units and install the new ones. Steve Hiatt, the store manager, assisted with the project. In addition to sporting a clean, modern design, the counters provide a level, stabilized surface for the scales which weigh items sold by weight. A small shelf can be pulled out of the customer's side of the counter to allow patrons in wheelchairs to write checks.
For those inquiring minds, the lights which indicate whether a particular checkout lane is opened or closed will be returning. The McCord's are deciding whether to remount the old lights or install new ones. The consensus seems to favor retaining the old ones in a nod to nostalgia.
There are other improvements planned in the near future as well. McCord will replace the current meat case with a new, energy efficient model in February and noted they have other projects in the planning stage. As for the revolving table, a store staple for decades? It will be there for the foreseeable future as any mechanical parts which might fail are easily replaced. The table, custom built for the store, utilizes parts from a Volkswagen Beetle.

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Money available for repair of tainter gates at Harlan

After being on the waiting list for several years, it appears work will be starting in 2015 to repair the difficult to move tainter gates at Harlan County Reservoir. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the dam's operator, has $12.3 million with which to begin repairing the 18 gates located along the face of the dam.
Corrosion which has built up on the gates installed more than 60 years ago has combined with bearing problems making many of the gates difficult to move and there are seven that currently can't be opened.
The reservoir's gates serve several purposes. Some are regularly opened to release water into the irrigation canals, others are opened for the normal release of water into the Republican River. Some are opened only when the lake is full and flood water must be released into the river.
In recent years it has been more common for the dam operators to deal with a shortage rather than a surplus of water. On Oct. 31, the reservoir was filled to 1,930.24 feet above sea level. This was only 3.24 feet above the top of the inactive pool. During October, the average daily inflow into the lake was 36 cubic feet per second. The gates were closed the entire month but the lake level continued to decline as evaporation exceeded the inflow. The lake lost 1,121 acre feet of water during October. Because of the low level, Nebraska irrigators were not allowed to take water from the lake in 2014 and are not expecting to do so in 2015.
The initial gate repair project is expected to take 3.5 years to complete. The repair of the remaining gates which are not part of the current project is expected to cost nearly $14 million. It is thought that money will be available when needed.
Only three gates will be worked on at a time. Plans are to build a temporary barrier in front the gates being worked on so it will not be necessary to release water because of the repairs.
Tuesday land owners served by the Nebraska Bostwick Irrigation District learned their district has engaged legal counsel to purse a lawsuit on behalf of the district and its members to protect the district's water rights.
The district directors have taken the position that ground water pumping has reduced the surface flows available to the district. Current Nebraska water administration rules are placing the burden of compact compliance with Kansas on the surface water irrigators while allowing ground water irrigators to continue to pump.
In 2013 and 2014, the district contents the district's senior water rights were curtailed while the junior ground water rights for pumping were allowed to continue.
The district will content that inequitable administration of ground and surface water in the Republican River basin is contrary to state and federal law.
If the court action is successful, the district expects to receive compensation for damages.
Tainter gates common worldwide
The Tainter gate like those installed on the Harlan County Dam was invented and first implemented in Menomonie, Wisc. Similar gates are now used worldwide. The following information about Tainter gates was obtained from Wikipedia:
A side view of a Tainter gate resembles a slice of pie with the curved part of the piece facing the source or upper pool of water and the tip pointing toward the destination or lower pool. The curved face or skinplate of the gate takes the form of a wedge section of cylinder. The straight sides of the pie shape, the trunnion arms, extend back from each end of the cylinder section and meet at a trunnion which serves as a pivot point when the gate rotates.
Pressure forces acting on a submerged body act perpendicular to the body's surface. The design of the Tainter gate results in every pressure force acting through the center of the imaginary circle which the gate is a section of, so that all resulting pressure force acts through the pivot point of the gate, making construction and design easier.
When a Tainter gate is closed, water bears on the convex (upstream) side. When the gate is rotated, the rush of water passing under the gate helps to open and close the gate. The rounded face, long radial arms and trunnion bearings allow it to close with less effort than a flat gate. Tainter gates are usually controlled from above with a chain or cable, gearbox and electric motor.
A critical factor in Tainter gate design is the amount of stress transferred from the skinplate through the radial arms and to the trunnion and the resulting friction encountered when raising or lowering the gate. Some older systems have had to be modified to allow for frictional forces for which the original design did not plan.
The Tainter gate is used in water control dams and locks worldwide. The Upper Mississippi River basin alone has 321 Tainter gates, and the Columbia River basin has 195. A Tainter gate is also used to divert the flow of water to San Fernando Power Plant on the Los Angeles Aqueduct.

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Declining mail service presents Thanksgiving week challenges

Readers of this newspaper are encouraged to pay close attention to the starting dates associated with many of the advertising inserts included in this newspaper. Because of the reduction in postal service, some merchants decided to include in this edition advertising that in previous years would have been included in the Thanksgiving Week paper.
The next Express will be printed late Tuesday with the hope some subscribers will have their copies prior to the Thanksgiving holiday. It will be available for purchase Wednesday at newsstands in Nelson, Superior and Mankato and available that afternoon via internet.
The newspaper office will be closed Thursday but open regular hours the rest of the week.
Next week's paper will include several advertisements for Small Town Saturday which will be observed by Superior stores.

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Another chapter of Nuckolls County history closed in 1939
Another page of Nuckolls County history was completed on a Sunday in 1939 when at the abandoned Aiken school house 30 some families gathered  to honor the family of Mr. and Mrs. Jim Dunken, pioneer residents of the community. The Dunkens were the last of the old settlers to leave the OxBow Creek Community.
In July of 1873, Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Dunken and three children arrived in Nuckolls County from Wisconsin and took a homestead on Oxbow Creek, three miles north of Nelson along what is now known as Highway 14 and where the Arbor Ferebee family was living in 1939 when this story was first printed. No roads were in sight, everyone just struck out across the prairie in the direction they chose to go. However, to cross Oxbow Creek, it was necessary to come to a break in the banks, and it was near this spot Mr. Dunken built their first Nebraska home of huge logs which remained standing as a symbol of sturdiness and worth until taken down when the new Highway 14 was put in.
The Dunkens settled down to pioneer life and Dec. 12 of the following year (1874) a son was born. The name James Daniel was given him. This youngster bore the distinction of being the first baby born to settlers in Nelson precinct. His schooling took place at Bethel, only a short distance from the family home. He not only learned the "three R's" but also to battle for his rights and those of his fellowman. At home, his father taught him the art of hunting and the boy proved to be a bright pupil.
       When the Spanish American War called for able-bodied men, Jim answered the call, enlisting on the same month and day, May 10th, as his father enlisted in the Civil War, only it was 37 years later. Both were members of Company H in their respective regiments. Jim the 1st Nebraska and his father the 5th Wisconsin.
At the close of the war, he returned with his company on Aug. 31, 1899, and resumed his usual duties on his father's farm.
On June 8th, 1873, along Oxbow creek, two miles down from the Dunken homestead, J. C. Reeve (better know as Clement) arrived with his family from Indiana, and homesteaded. The family's first home was a snug and warm dugout dug into the bank near the creek.
In 1939 evidence of this dugout was still visible.
The first winter the Reeves lived in the dugout but the next year they purchased and hauled from Edgar enough lumber to build a one-story structure with a full basement.
On Aug. 27, 1876, a baby girl. named Amanda Olive was born.  She attended District 26 school which was located across the creek. At the age of four she became the youngest of the 20 pupils attending the school. The oldest was 20. After growing to womanhood, she married Jim Dunken.

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