THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

April 16, 2015

 

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NEWS!

Superior schools order two new buses

Curling is for more than hair

Dumpsters will arrive April 29

Time to schedule a citywide garage sale

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The Superior Express & Jewell County News 16 April 2015

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Superior schools order two new buses

Members of the Superior Board of Education approved two certified contracts Monday evening in regular session. Shelley (Mellott) Mueller will fill Laura Corman's language arts position and Jordan Martin will fill Linda Simonson's social science position. Mueller is a Superior High School graduate, has taught for the South Central Unified School system and most recently been a regular substitute for Superior Public School. She is certified seven through 12 in both language arts and social science. She will also assist with junior high volleyball. Martin attended the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. He student taught at North East and in addition to his teaching responsibilities will be responsible for the drama program in Superior.
The resignation of Patty Paxton, effective at the end of the this school year, was approved. Paxton has taught in the Superior School system 29 of her 34 years as an elementary instructor.
March claims from the general fund of the amount of $555,030.69 were approved. Supt. Isom said expenditures included the purchase of a new kindergarten through sixth grade reading series from McGraw-Hill for $56,244.
In other business, members of the Board of Education voted to renew membership in the ESU 9 Title I Cooperative. They also approved the purchase of a new school bus from Cornhusker International Trucks. It will be a 201 Integrated CE S bus for $82,650. A grant for $19,600 from Environmental Quality will be used to pay for the new bus which will be used as a route bus. The grant requires the bus it replaced be disabled by cutting the chassis in half and drilling a hole through the motor. Supt. Isom said, "We could not have sold the old bus for $19.600."
The purchase of a 2016 Chevrolet Express 3500 for $29,910 was also approved. It does not have a front passenger seat and will be used to transport preschool children. Supt. Isom said, "We looked at a Suburban, but it would have cost $10,000 more and the used van we considered would have cost $3,000 less but already had 25,000 miles on it."
The board also approved the purchase of a new mower from Superior Outdoor Power for $15,744. The mower will cut a 60 inch wide swath. Supt. Isom will check to be sure a snow blower attachment already owned by the school will fit before trading in the current mower. Trade-in is worth $3,250.
Doug Hoins, elementary principal, reported the elementary school participated in a mock tornado drill during National Weather Awareness Week in late March. "There is enough room in the shelter area for the entire kindergarten through sixth grade student population and staff."
He also reported six staff members had attended a workshop entitled "No More Meltdowns" presented by Jed Baker. The workshop provided teachers with proactive behavior strategies to use with students who have emotional difficulties and behaviors.
The building and grounds committee reported they are considering bus cameras for the four route buses. The cameras can "see" and record action in 95 percent of the seating area. Supt Isom said, "At times one needs to be able to say 'Come here. See what I see?" The cameras are infra red, so they work in both light and dark. Jason Jensen, a board member, encouraged the committee to also consider cameras for activity buses.
Supt. Isom also has interest in a GPS system which provides a record of bus speed at specific locations along a journey which can be reviewed by administrators.
Summer work projects include replacing the patio area just to the east of the dining commons. Supt. Isom said, "The northwest corner and the northeast corner have sunk and water drains below the main building's foundation."
Plans are also in place to build a sidewalk to the track rest rooms and move the main entry gate to the east end of the track.
The long range planning committee reported they are exploring career education and ways to expose students to the real life work situation during high school. The community economic development committee has approached the school district about having a career fair. Matt Sullivan, board president, said, "College is so expensive. Students need to start with specific career goals."
Supt. Isom asked board members if they would support hiring an integrative technology specialist. Considerable discussion followed exploring the need for the position and how it could be funded. One possibility is to use money from the cooperative fund and share the position with another school district.
For several months members of a committee have been revising the superintendent evaluation tool. According to board policy, a first year superintendent must be evaluated every semester and once a year thereafter. The proposed tool has seven standards each with a list of indcators which board members are to mark as satisfactory or as unsatisfactory. If an indicator is marked unsatisfactory, then the board member is to add a written comment. The seven areas are board relations, community and district relations, educational leadership, personnel leadership and managment, policy and governance, professional growth and financial managment. A final draft most likely will be approved at the June meeting.
The meeting adjourned at 8:45 p.m. All members were present.

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Curling is for more than hair

By Marty Pohlman
When Ty Rempe, the son of James and Melody Rempe, Superior, attended Superior High School he participated in the mainstream sports of cross country and track and field. Upon his graduation in 2012, he enrolled at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, majoring in mechanical engineering. He resided in an off-campus house where a chance encounter with one of his housemates, a South Dakota native, led to his participation in a non-traditional sport. Said housemate was member of the university curling club and he invited Rempe to a team practice. He was persuaded to throw one of the stones and he was hooked on the stones. Last year he became a team member of the club which is sanctioned by the United States College Curling Association.
For those of us who associate curling with beauty salons and appliances left laying about in the bathroom to burn the unwary, curling is not about hair. Curling is a sport with a long tradition. It was invented in medieval Scotland and has been around since the 16th century and emigrated with the Scottish people to New Zealand and Canada in later centuries. The first curling club in the United States was formed in 1830. The sport now has a world-wide reach from Scotland to Japan to the United States.
The game is a team sport with individual players. It may be played indoors or outdoors with university matches being played indoors. There are two types of playing areas. Arena ice is just that; a non-dedicated surface which can be utilized for a match and dedicated ice which is used only for curling events. The surface or sheet is a flat, level area, 146 to 150 feet long and 14.5 to 16.5 feet wide. At each end of the sheet is an area referred to as the hose. It is centered on a center line, drawn lengthwise down the ice. The house consists of a center circle and three concentric rings of four, eight and 12 feet. The circles are formed by painting the ice or laying a vinyl sheet below the ice surface. Two hog lines are drawn on the ice 37 feet from the backboard. These are used for aiming and measuring the distance of stone from the button or center circle. Behind each button are two fixed hacks, rubber lined holes, into which a device resembling starting blocks used in track are placed, which players use to push off as they throw a stone.
The stones are made from granite from a single quarry in Scotland and one in Wales. They are polished and have a hole in the center to which a handle is attached. They have a circumference of 36 inches and are shaped so that only a small ring area on the bottom is in contact with the ice. Each stone weighs between 38 and 44 pounds with a weight of 42 pounds being the preferred weight for collegiate use. The handles on the stone are colored so as to identify the team to which they belong. Each stone carries a cost of $2,500. Each team will have a minimum of 32 stones.
The other piece of unusual equipment is the broom which no longer resembles a kitchen broom. Once made from corn strands, modern curling brooms use man-made fabrics or natural fibers such as hog or horsehair. The function of the broom is not to sweep ice shavings but to melt the ice so the stone is able to hydroplane on the thin surface of water on the surface. By tactical sweeping and strategy, stones may be induced to curve around stones which are in their path.
Special shoes are worn to assist the thrower. The slider shoe usually has a Teflon sole and is worn by the thrower during the delivery and by the sweepers as they move down the track. The gripper shoe is placed against the hack and helps the thrower push off. Ordinary athletic shoes may be fitted with slip-on soles.
A curling match is known as a bonspiel.
The object of the game is similar to shuffleboard or lawn boules. The teams attempt to place their stones as close to the center ring or button as possible. Each team has four members who throw the stones. The player guides the stone up to the hog line, retaining a grip on the stone handle. The broom is held in the opposite hand and is used to provide stability. The thrower releases the stone at the hog line with a pushing motion. The sweepers work from each side of the stone's track. The ice has been spritzed with water to form pebbles and the sweepers are trying to remove the pebbles and provide a friction-free path for the stone to travel to the house. Crossing the hog line is a violation and results in the throw being disqualified. The honor system is the primary means of enforcement, though electronic devices can be fitted to the handles to detect violations.
The order of play is determined by a coin flip. The winner determines the order in which the teams will throw. The team throwing first is referred to as the color with the second team called the hammer. Each player throws two stones. The second player attempts to displace any of the opposition stones from near the button while positioning their stone in that position. When all 16 stones have been thrown the end is complete. Scoring is simple. The team with a stone closest to the button wins the end. Points are then awarded for the rest of that team's stones which are inside of the opposition. The team not close to the button receives no points. A complete game consists of eight ends. The winner is the team which has accumulated the most points after eight ends. Should the teams be tied, play is continued until the tie is broken.
The team hosted their first meet this season, the Big red Bonspiel, at Omaha with seven schools competing at the event. The team practices in Omaha each Sunday at Arena Ice and meets Monday to review previous matches and maps strategy for their next bonspiel. The past season was a breakout one for the team. Against stiff competition from established programs in the Northeast and upper Midwest, they found themselves holding the number one ranking in the nation when the regular season ended. They travel as far afield as Milwaukee and Minnesota for bonspiels. Their top ranking earned the team an invite to the National bonspiel held in Rochester, N.Y. Competing against the top teams in the country, they finished in sixth place in the 12 team field. Rempe looks forward to playing another season for the team before he graduates.
Rempe will spend the summer doing an internship at Reinke Manufacturing Company in Deshler. He will return for more bonspiels in the winter. Should he pursue a graduate degree at UN-L, he is eligible to play until he reaches the age of 25. Rempe notes that all the bonspiels are open to the public. Lest you think of curling as a benign spectator sport, Rempe points out the quietest sound at a bonspiel are the cowbells. Maybe they should change the brooms to curling irons. More appropriate and they would melt the ice. The extension cords could be a problem but one could invent a battery powered unit. And more cowbell, please.

 

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Dumpsters will arrive April 29
Members of the Superior City Council continue to struggle with ways to promote the clean-up of Superior while controlling the costs associated with the annual clean-up program.
When the program first began, the city offered free dumpster service at a central location for a limited number of hours and arranged for assistance in transporting materials to the collection site.
Over the years the program has evolved and changed. The number of days the dumpsters were available increased and 24-7 access to the dumpsters was allowed.
Since the program started, a number of restrictions have been added. For example one year, an entire house was crushed and delivered to the collection site. Such an activity is no longer allowed. After a large quantity of materials were removed from the dumpsters and piled on a private lot, the recycling of material was stopped.
Last year the hours of operation were reduced, a charge was assessed for each load and attendants were stationed at the collection site. However, that program resulted in the city paying for approximately 65 hours of overtime. Some council members have objected to the costs associated with the overtime pay.
Possible changes in the program were debated at length.
This year the dumpsters will be located near the old water treatment plant on South Central. They will be available for Superior residents only from April 29 through June 3. Hours will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Fridays and Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon. All persons delivering trash will be required to sign in and a $10 per load fee will be collected, regardless of the size of load.
Nothing can be put in garbage bags. Yard waste, household garbage, hazardous wastes, buildings, siding, shingles or tires will not be accepted.
It was reported at the council meeting that the properties at 317 and 321 Park Street for which an abatement order had been issued at the March 23 council meeting had been sold and the new owner had removed the materials causing a problem. Thus the abatement order had been cancelled. However, there were questions concerning the new owner's plan to store materials in one of the houses while upgrading the other.
While the owner has a positive record of property improvement, some council members questioned if he could legally use one house for storage while upgrading the other.
No decision was reached Monday night.
The abatement order directing the cleanup of the yard at 214 West Third Street was allowed to stand.
The council reviewed plans for landscaping the lot west of the city office building but said more information was needed before a decision could be reached.
The council did approve making the front entrance to the city office building handicapped accessible. It will cost about $7,300 to install the required replacement doors.
The council approved the officers selected by members of the Superior Volunteer Fire Department. Todd Kroger is chief, T. J. Morris, assistant chief, Ken Rempe, president, Kirk Young, vice president, Jim Smith, secretary, and Elmer Rempe, treasurer. Scott Nondorf, John Rogers and Matt Meyer are trustees. Shawn Bray is a new member of the department.

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Time to schedule a citywide garage sale
Storage places are being cleaned and items are being selected that will be offered for sale next the annual spring rendition of the Superior Community-wide Garage Sale.
The annual event sponsored by this newspaper is held each year on the fourth Saturday of April. A similar summer event is held on the second Saturday of August.
Both days draw a large number of thrifty shoppers to Superior.
As an incentive for placing their ads early, those ads received at The Express by mid-morning today (Thursday) will appear not only in the classified section of this edition of the newspaper, they will also appear in next week's Leader section and on this newspaper's internet page.
The Leader is a common section that appears twice a month in this newspaper as well as the newspaper published at Mankato, Hebron, Geneva and Sutton. The Leader normally is printed on Friday afternoon and trucked over the weekend to the participating newspapers for insertion in their next issue. However, the printing and delivery schedule is being advanced this week because of the annual Nebraska Press Association meeting that will be held in Lincoln and Friday and Saturday. Representatives from most Nebraska newspaper will be in Lincoln this week to attend the meeting.
When ordering a garage sale advertisement in the next issue, those placing the ad will receive a sign which they may display in their yard designating their location as an official participant.
When inspecting the garage sales, we encourage shoppers to look for the official signs. There are always a few freeloaders who don't register for the sale and attempt to profit from the advertising purchased by the official participants.
The week the Jewell Chamber of Commerce is coordinating a garage sale in that southern Jewell County community. The chamber paid for the placement of ads in this issue of The Express and Jewell County Record advertising 19 Jewell sales.

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