THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

Oct. 30, 2014

 

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NEWS!

Nebraska receives full pumping credit

City, state races spark local interest

'Lighthouse Project' offers help to those who need it

Tai chi classes now offered in Superior

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The Superior Express 30 October 2014

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Nebraska receives full pumping credit

An agreement reached last Wednesday gives Nebraska 100 percent credit for augmentation water NRDs are pumping this year to maintain compliance with the Republican River Compact, and ensures water being stored in Harlan County Reservoir for compliance purposes won't go to waste.
The agreement approved by the Republican River Compact Administration in Denver could be a precursor to a similar deal for 2015 and illustrates a new, positive working relationship between Kansas and Nebraska that benefits water users in both states.
"The resolution approved by the RRCA allows water now being held in Harlan County Reservoir to be released to Kansas during the 2015 irrigation season when it can be beneficially used, without compromising Nebraska's ability to maintain compact compliance," said Jim Schneider, deputy director of the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources who chaired the RRCA meeting on Wednesday. "The ability of the states to work together in resolving these issues is a significant step forward."
Combined, the Rock Creek Augmentation Project in Dundy County operated by the Upper Republican NRD and the NCORPE augmentation project in Lincoln County operated by the Upper Republican, Middle Republican and Lower Republican NRDs in 2014 will add approximately 63,500 acre feet of water to the Republican River system. Had the agreement approved Wednesday not been approved, Nebraska would get credit for just 37,000 acre feet.
"This agreement reflects the intent of the compact settlement, giving the appropriate credit for augmentation and allowing our downstream neighbors every opportunity to use the water that the irrigators and taxpayers in the Basin paid to provide through the projects implemented under the settlement agreement. The agreement should provide Nebraskans assurance that water being added to streams in 2014 effectively prevented a shutdown of more than 300,000 irrigated acres in the basin this year and that we aren't being required to do more than what we should under the agreement.The fact Kansas and Nebraska were able to reach an agreement that accomplishes this and at the same time benefits both Kansas and Nebraska water users should be commended," said Jasper Fanning, general manager of the Upper Republican Natural Resources District.
Had the agreement not been struck, Nebraska potentially would have been forced to release roughly 30,000 acre feet of water now stored in Harlan County reservoir for compliance purposes downstream to Kansas during fall and winter months when it couldn't be used by irrigators, as well as passing inflows through the reservoir for the rest of the year.
Under the agreement approved Wednesday by the three states party to the compact, Kansas water users could get 20,000 to 25,000 acre feet next year, and the balance could be used by irrigators in the Nebraska Bostwick Irrigation District.
The agreement Wednesday comes on the heels of oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court last week regarding a special master's recommendations that 300,000 acres of irrigated land in the Republican Basin not be permanently shut down as Kansas had requested and that Nebraska pay a penalty of $5.5 million for overuse in 2005 and 2006 instead of the approximately $80 million Kansas had sought. A final decision by the court on that matter is expected by the end of June.

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City, state races spark local interest

Nuckolls County polls will open at 8 a.m. Tuesday at six locations.
Registered voters of Beaver 1, 2 and 3 will cast their ballots at the Superior Church of Christ. Elk Precinct voters will vote at the Oak Fire Hall. The Hardy polling place will in the village fire hall. Nelson voters will cast ballots at the auditorium. Spring Creek voters will go to the Ruskin Community Fire Hall. The voting place for Lawrence will be fire hall.
There are no county races this time. Barring a write-in, races for sheriff, county commissioner and clerk were settled at the primary. Not more than one candidate filed for the other country offices.
There are races for mayor in both Nelson and Superior.
In Superior Kent Jensby, a member of the council is challenging the incumbent, Sonia Schmidt for the office of mayor. Jon Bruning was defeated in the primary but we understand he is a write-in candidate for mayor.
At Nelson the incumbent, Arlan Drudik is being challenged by James Woerner.
Three candidates are running for the two City of Nelson council seats. The names of Kathryn Brethour, Dale Uhrmacher and Vicky Garner will appear on the ballot.
For the Superior City Council two residents of the same block, Donald Tyler and Rick Disney are seeking to replace Robert Tipton as the third ward councilman. Tipton did not seek re-election.
Carrie Lemke is running unopposed for the Ward I and Steve Fox is unopposed for Ward II.
Three people are seeking the three seats on the Superior School Board. Darren Willett is a current member. Matthew Bargen and Jason Jensen seek to replace Darrell Kile and Steve Renz who chose not to seek re-election.
Philip Brockman is seeking a two year term on the Lawrence-Nelson school board. Only two candidates, Dwayne Buescher and Susan Karmazin are seeking the three four year terms on the board.
Three positions are to be filled on the Nora village board. Candidates are Helen Gebers, Robert Williams and B. J. Gardner.
Two positions are to be filled on Oak village board. Candidates are Gregory Stichka and Craig Lowery.
Marjorie Renz is the only candidate to file for the two positions to be filled on the Hardy village board.
Two positions are open at Ruskin but no one filed.
Two candidates, Marlene Faimon and Casey Troudt have filed for the three Village of Lawrence board seats.
Michael Pearce is seeking re-election to the Superior Airport Authority Board. Two positions are to be filled.
Early voters may have already mailed in their ballots for the upcoming general election, but for those who will head to the polls on election day, Secretary of State John Gale offers the following reminders:
Check your voter registration and polling place. People can check the status of their voter registration and location of their polling place by contacting their county election office or accessing https://www.votercheck.necvr.ne.gov/. That is also the same place where voters can check the status of their early voting ballot or their provisional ballot.
Change of address. If a registered voter has moved within a county (out of their former precinct) and not updated their registration, the person should go to the polling place associated with their current residence. The person will be required to vote a provisional ballot. Voters can check their registered address at https://www.votercheck.necvr.ne.gov/.
Be prepared. Before going to the polls, the voter should become informed about the candidates and issues on the ballot. Sample ballots are printed in newspapers and posted on county websites. Mark and take the sample ballot with you to the polling place.
Conduct at the polls. To maintain proper decorum at the polls, it is requested that people turn off their cell phones, smart phones and other electronic devices.
Campaigning prohibited. Campaign items such as buttons, stickers and T-shirts are not allowed in a polling place. It is illegal to campaign within 200 feet of a polling site.
Voter identification. Proper identification may be required at the polling place of people who are newly registered by mail and have not voted previously in Nebraska or provided identification with their application. These people may be required to provide identification showing their current residence. Identification at the polling place is not required of other voters.
Early voting ballots. Up until the day prior to the election, people may still vote early in person at the county election office. Early ballots sent by mail must be received by the close of polls on election day. Anyone with a completed early voting ballot can turn it in at the county election office. They will not be accepted at the polling place.
Provisional ballots. Voters whose early voting ballots are lost, spoiled or not received at the county election office may vote provisionally at the polls on election day with a provisional ballot. That ballot will be counted once it is confirmed that no other ballots have been cast for that particular voter.
Gale expects the statewide voter turnout will exceed 50 percent.
With a major petition initiative on the ballot with strong positions on both sides, an open U.S. Senate seat and the first open seat for governor in 16 years, Gale added, "There's a plateful of big reasons to motivate people to vote in the upcoming general election.
"While I am counting on the top of the ticket to produce a meaningful turnout, let me also point out that local ballot issues and races need good turnout as well. It's often the local races that have a more direct impact on voters, and there are lots of those choices on the ballot"
In 2010, the last non-presidential election voter turnout was 43 percent. Gale said he expected a boost in turnout this year based on several factors: voter registration has increased by about 8,000 people since the primary, early voting has been robust and the state's three largest counties are expecting turnouts of around 45 percent.
Gale went on to remind citizens that "voting is a chance to be captain of their ship. As a 'government of the people, by the people and for the people,' we honor our forefathers who wrote our U.S. Constitution, acknowledge the sacrifices of our veterans, and thank our ancestors who preserved our representative democracy that we inherited from them. In the broader scheme of things, the world is watching to see if we walk the walk and not just talk the talk. We need to validate what we tell other nations about the values of a democracy."
Statewide voter registration for the general election totals 1,159,085. Registration breakdown by political affiliation is: Republican Party, 559,494; Democratic Party, 357,899; nonpartisan, 235,984; and Libertarian 5,708.
Unofficial election results for statewide races will be posted starting at 8 p.m on the main page of the Secretary of State's website http://www.sos.ne.gov.

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'Lighthouse Project' offers help to those who need it

Seeking ways to become more involved with the people in his community, Jeff Kimberly, pastor of the Superior Church of the Nazarene, inquired at Community Action about ways his congregation could help those who were struggling with the city's requirement to clean up their properties.
Jana Chase told him Bernice Miller needed a ramp to make it easier to get her brother in and out of the house to be transported for various appointments.
On Aug. 27, several members of the church constructed a ramp for the Millers. They designed it to leave the southwest corner of the porch and run north toward the garage. That would make sure a "runaway" wheelchair would not end up in the street. The Millers said they were pleased with the outcome.
Later, Jolanda Bouray, from Nuckolls County Senior Services, notified Kimberly of a need for another ramp, this time at the home of Delmar Shrontz. That project was completed on Sunday.
A total of 17 workers met at the church for breakfast, including a group from the Superior Good Samaritan Center who had expressed the desire to be involved. Delmar said he is quite pleased with the outcome. It allows him to leave his home through the front door rather than the garage.
Also on Sunday, Donna Christensen said she was surprised when workers came to her house on Second Street and painted her trim.
"Everyone knew about it except me," Christensen said. "And they even picked a color I would have picked myself."
The Good Samaritan Center provided the lunch, which was served in Delmar's yard by Missy Wilt, the center's chaplain.
Collectively, these "neghbors helping neighbors" projects have been dubbed "The Lighthouse Project," and are being funded by the Church of the Nazarene and the Good Samaritan Center.

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Tai chi classes now offered in Superior
"I began going to tai chi classes a month ago, although it was available for a year or so earlier. I was too busy or just didn't feel good so I kept putting it off," said Sandra Foote, Superior. "Every time I heard about it I thought, 'When I feel better or have the time, I will try it.' Finally, this year I did and I love it. Even when I don't feel up to it either physically or emotionally, I feel much better after the session, which only lasts about one hour."
Karen Fox, Marlice Sullivan and Kathe Ely are the tai chi instructors in Superior.
"My motivation is to make it so everybody has better balance and flexibility," Fox said. "Plus, all these things help with physical function."
The benefits of tai chi can reportedly be seen in everyday life, increasing flexibility, working muscles and breathing and forcing participants to focus. Participants report it is fun, relaxed and relaxing. It is also a slow meditative and can even alleviate mood distresses.
During tai chi lessons, participants learn various movements that support balance, an important issue for older people. The movements can also reduce blood pressure and blood sugar levels, boost immunity to shingles and ease stress, according to some studies. Tai chi works by improving the flow of energy known as "chi" in the body. Many health experts recognize the benefits of tai chi, especially for older adults. This is not to say that younger people cannot come to the classes. Mobility issues can happen at any age. With age, people tend to lose muscle strength and mobility because of decreased range of motion. Also, the communication between the brain and muscles declines, causing older people to be more susceptible to falls. Tai chi has been shown to improve agility and reduce the risk and fear of falling.
"One of my excuses for not going to tai chi classes was because I did not feel good and I had aches and pains. If you have osteoarthritis, you might tend to baby your aching joints or not move them. In doing so, you can make things worse by losing strength and flexibility in the muscles around the joint," Foote said. "Tai chi can combat this vicious cycle. With tai chi, you're going through a full pain-free range of motion and challenging the joint as much as you possibly can while maintaining comfortable movement. It's smooth and low impact, so there are no short, jerking movements that may potentially cause discomfort."
Modified versions of tai chi performed while sitting on a chair or stool are available for people with severe lower extremity arthritis or disabilities.
Fox, Sullivan and Ely took their instruction from Suman Sensei Barkhas, offered through South Heartland District Health Department in Hastings. Barkhas apparently worked with an orthopedic surgeon and noticed how people walked in airports. He noticed balance issues and posture issues. Tai chi is beneficial and there is a noticeable reduction in the amount of falls among participants.
The current class in Superior is full, but watch for announcents in this newspaper for future classes. Tai chi classes in Superior are sponsored by Nuckolls County Senior Services and the Midland Area Agency on Aging.

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