THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

Jan. 29, 2015

 

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NEWS!

Superior Council renews well head protection plan

Byron Lion's Club holds anniversary banquet

SPUCC directors believe group is at 'crossroads'

Couple with ties to Byron building veterans walls

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Superior Council renews well head protection plan

Apparently members of the general public are in agreement with the proposed revisions to the Superior Well Head Protection District first organized in 2005.
Several months ago a committee was formed to review the current plan and develop changes. Copies of the revised plan have been available and public notice of the revised plan's availability was published for seven week in this newspaper.
When members of the Superior City Council held a public hearing to take comments about the proposed changes Monday evening. No one spoke either for or against the proposal.
Larry Brittenham, city utility manager, reported the State of Nebraska had continued to refine the models used to define where the water Superior draws from the aquifer is coming from. This refined model allows a reduction in the size of the well-head protection district.
The proposed changes were adopted unanimously by members of the council.
In other action Monday the council appointed the South Central Economic Development District to serve as the community's nuisance abatement officer. When the council met two weeks ago, approval was given to extend the contract with the mulit-county agency for nuisance abatement services. Later this spring another group of Superior properties will be inspected for compliance with the city nuisance code.
In a related matter, the council opened discussion about the city-wide clean-up dumpsters.
In recent years the council has provided roll-off dumpsters for public use sometime during the summer.
In the first years the dumpsters were available for a weekend. Some years they have been available for several months.
Last year was the first year the citizens were charged for using the dumpsters. The charge apparently reduced the amount of trash collected.
Last year the city set hours for the dumpsters' use and charged $10 each time a citizen brought a load to be disposed of. The size of load did not affect the price. The city collected $1,200 and paid $7,527 to have the dumpsters hauled away and the trash disposed of.
Traditionally the dumpsters have not been available until June. Councilman Kent Jensby suggested making them available prior to the Memorial Day weekend so those residents interested in cleaning their property prior to the Lady Vestey Victorian Festival could utilize them
The topic was tabled before a decision was reached.
The project to remodel the restroom in the Public Safety Building to make it handicapped accessible was reviewed by the council. A list of more than 15 items which the contractor had completed satisfactorily was approved. That list will be sent to the contractor who will have two weeks to complete the work to the city's standard.
A separate contract was approved for Walt's Furniture to install new floor covering in the remodelled restroom.
Larry Brittenham reported on a conference he had attended two weeks ago in Lincoln. Forestry experts on the program advised the city should begin planning for the arrival of ash borers. While just reaching Nebraska, the borers are expected to do to the ash trees what Dutch Elm Disease did to the American Elms.
Brittenham said he was told now is the time to begin a program of removing the trees as likely all will die shortly after the problem reaches Superior.
While no formal action was taken it appeared to be the consensus that steps be taken to inform the community on the seriousness of the problem and what could be done.
Brittenham noted the state forestry experts had warned that many of the suggested treatment options would not work and that it would cost a considerable amount of money for the annual treatment of a susceptible tree.
It was suggested a variety of trees be selected as replacements.
The number of ash trees within the community has not been determined. It was suggested the city began a program of taking down ash trees now growing on city property that are storm damaged or nearing the end of their lifespan.

 

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Byron Lion's Club holds anniversary banquet

Members of the Byron Lions Club celebrated the 50th anniversary of the club founding with a banquet at the Byron Community Center Sunday evening.
The program included an anniversary address by Debbie Bennett, district governor. Bill and Evonne Williams reported on the Remembering Our Fallen endeavor they have been associated with.
Elmer Holmes the only active charter member was honored for 50 years of service to the club.
The club's charter members were Harold Bandemer, Joe Dittmer, A. R. Eitzmann, Arthur Eitzmann, Curtis Fintel, Erwin Fintel, Fred Fintel, Keith Frye, Clarence Gebers, E. J. Grupe, Paul Harms, Merlin Heitmann, Donald Hemje, Elmer Holmes, Kenneth Holmes, Rudolph Hoops, Vernon Hoops, Edwin Kirchhoff, Lawrence Kirchhoff, Harold Kniep, Charles Kuhlmann, Cecil Marquart, Harold Mitchell, Otto Moeller, Fred Pohlmann, Eugene Reinke, Ronald Reinke, W. G. Reinke, Clarence Schocke, the Rev. John Sitler, Frederick Tiejen, Ted Tietjen Jr., Verland Tietjen, Ralph Wenske, W. W. Williams and John F. Young.
Current members are Loren Bohling, Roger Bohling, Larry Cheney, Arlis Eitzmann, Harlan Eitzmann, Scott Eitzmann, Lonny Freitag, Doyle Heitmann, Jeremy Heitmann, Lavern Heitmann, Marlyn Heitmann, Steve Heitmann, Elmer Holmes, Lonnie Hoops, Mike Hoops, A. J. Johnson, Eldon Kirchhoff, Glenn Kirchhoff, Erwin Kniep, Brad Krenke, Wayne Krenke, Kenneth Naysmith, Randy Nelson, Darren Saunders, Lyle Schardt, Garrett Schroer, Cal Tietjen, Kent Tietjen, Tyler Tietjen, Alan Wenske, Dave Wenske and Tim Wenske.
Current officers are Scott Eitzmann, president, Mike Hoops, first vice president, Alan Wenske, second vice prsident, Glenn Kirchhoff, third vice president, Tyler Tietjen, secretary, A. J. Johnson, treasurer, Arlis Eitzmann, David Wenskey, Eldon Kirchhoff and Steve Heitmann, directors.
Past presidents of the club starting with the first and continuing through last year include Keith Frye, Clarence Gebers, Harold Bandemer, A. R. Eitzmann, Gaylord Anderson, Dennis Moeller, Clarence Reinke, Lawrence Kirchhoff, Vernon Hoops, Erwin Kniep, Egbert Schardt, Elmer Holmes, Orville Heitmann, Harvey Hoops, Eldon Kirchhoff, Edgar Kuhlmann, LaVern Heitmann, Erwin Kniep, Ben Kemper, Lyle Schardt, Lonnie Hoops, Vernon Hoops, Daryl Kniep, Marlin Bohling, Kent Tietjen, Randy Nelson, Paul Kniep, Kevin Hoops, Arlis Eitzmann, Doyle Heitmann, Mike Hoops, David Nordstrom, Marlyn Heitmann, David Wenske, Roger Bohling, Larry Cheney, Steve Heitmann, Cal Tietjen, Marlyn Heitmann, Mike Hoops, Larry Cheney, Alan Wenske, Doyle Heitmann, Jeremy Heitmann, Arlis Eitzmann, Tyler Tietjen 2011-2013, and Marlyn Heitmann.
The Byron Lions Club has had two members serve as district governor, Ben Kemper (1981-1982) and Orvil Heitmann (1984-1985). Vernon Hoops served as district deputy governor (1981-1982). Orvil and Ben also served as state council chairman following their terms as district governor. Both received lifetime membership awards from Lions International. Orvil was the recipient of the Melvin Jones Award.
Current activities of the club include supplying Christmas lighting on the community's main street; sponsoring Santa's annual visit to Byron; distributing Christmas fruit baskets to shut-ins; collecting used eyeglasses; sponsoring the recycling trailer; providing the community calendar; annual pancake feed; annual peach and pear sales; remembering those who are ill with floral arrangements; helping with the Thayer County Fair Parade; and supporting Nebraska Lions Foundation projects.
Over the years, the Byron Lions Club has actively supported the community and surrounding area. Past service projects have included: sponsoring Little League ball teams; building a tennis court (This project received Best Community Project Award for Lions District 38-A); built restroom at the ball field; purchased and installed original playground equipment at the city park; built and equipped the concession building for use at the ball field and Thayer County Fair;
Replaced roof and siding and remodeled inside of the senior citizens center; helped remodel the library; made many ball field improvements including the purchase of a pitching machine and lights; renovated the school building for use as a community center; filled unused cisterns and cesspools; installed street signs; helped construct the helicopter pad at Thayer County Hospital; sponsored hunter safety and CPR classes; helped organize Byron Centennial and Fun Day celebrations; hosted fifth and sixth grade basketball tournament for several years; purchased and installed "Welcome to Byron" sign; sponsored Byron High School athletic banquets;
Sponsored softball teams; provided tables, chairs, and storage racks for school building and fire hall; purchased picnic tables for the city park; collected toys for children of needy families; collected and sold scrap iron; hosted many consignment sales and soup suppers; assisted with food stand at Byron Mud Drags; sponsored a blanket for a winning horse at Thayer County Downs; sent volunteers to help at the state fair eye booth; raked leaves for senior citizens; hosted numerous international exchange students; assisted numerous times with storm damage clean up; and sent care packages to servicemen and women in Iraq.
The club has provided monetary support for the following projects: Deshler and Chester rescue units; Byron Library; CHB and Deshler Schools' drug awareness programs; 4-H livestock sales; street improvements and main street sidewalks; new playground equipment;
Over the Rainbow preschool program; post-prom parties for area schools; American Cancer Society; Thayer and Nuckolls county food pantries; Hebron Junior Legion team's state tournament trip; Lions Mobile Screening Unit; Thayer Central After-School Program; Blue Valley Community Action; Kansas Specialty Dog Service training facility; Lions State convention; Chester Medical Center;
Food Basket benefit; Lions sight and hearing projects; local EMT education costs; Vietnam Memorial Moving Wall; optometry mission in Peru; Lions "Sight First" program; financial support for glasses, exams, and eye surgeries; Williamson Sight Clinic at the Nebraska Medical Center; "Focus on Health" program; Lions senior all-star golf tournament; postage for "Husker Heat" blankets sent to Iraq; local family-in-need benefits; bike-a-thon for St. Jude Children's Hospital and Relay for Life.
Most recently the club has donated more than $14,000 to the Byron Community Center and $2,000 to the Byron Volunteer Fire Department for kitchen cabinets.

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SPUCC directors believe group is at 'crossroads'

The South Platte United Chambers of Commerce (SPUCC) has an important agenda for its Feb. 10 meeting in Holdrege. Representatives from Superior were among those from an area south of the Platte River that helped form the original organization 80 years ago in Holdrege. At that time each member community was entitled to have one member on the board. Though times were tough in the 1930s a delegation from Superior regularly attended the meetings and several Superior residents, were over the years, selected to serve as the group's president.
Now the directors believe the 80-year-old group is at a crossroads and the members must decide to either reorganize or disband. Apparently, like with many communities local involvment in SPUCC has declined.
Although attendances at some meetings in the last two years have drawn large numbers, overall attendance has been down. Finding new and younger leadership has also been difficult, according to Tom Hastings, co-president.
The board met in January to discuss the future of SPUCC and it concluded that an open discussion with members should be held. The board said if the organization is going to move forward, the mission and goals should be updated. In addition, the format of meetings should be redesigned to fit the needs of the members.
Activities of SPUCC meetings recently have included political candidate forums and presentations on topics such as national healthcare, and water management. The stated mission of SPUCC is to further the economic and social welfare of the state of Nebraska with particular reference to the welfare of the territory from which it draws its membership.
Current membership includes some 20 counties south of the Platte River, extending from the Colorado state border to the east. Nuckolls County has traditionally been on the eastern edge of the membership area. Eastern membership has included the communities of Superior, Nelson, Lawrence, Clay Center and Aurora.
Members as well as any person interested in the future of SPUCC have been invited to attend the meeting Tuesday, Feb. 10 at the Taste of Texas restaurant in Holdrege. Dinner will be served at 6 with discussion following.
Those wanting to know more about the South Platte United Chambers of Commerce are welcome to contact the current board members who include Tim Anderson, Holdrege, co-president; Tom Hastings of Hastings, co-president; Jay Hall, Red Cloud, treasurer; Betty Sayers, Holdrege, and Nancy Herhahn, Plum Creek, co-secretaries; Kevin Poppe, Grant, western area representative; and Rex Nelson, McCook, past-president.
In the past years the group has actively lobbied on the state and national level for projects considered to be important to the region and promoted tourism and commercial development in the region.
Directors and committees met monthly in addition to the monthly dinner meetings held through out the region. Historically social activities included golf tournments, legislative dinners with members of the Unicameral, golf tournaments and trips to Lincoln via a special train to attend University of Nebraska football games.

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Couple with ties to Bryon building veterans walls
As part of the Byron Lions Club's 50th anniversary celebration held Sunday, former Byron residents, Bill and Evonne Williams, reported on their work with the Remembering the Fallen project. Monday's Omaha World-Herald published a front page story about Mr. and Mrs. Williams' latest and largest memorial wall project which opens Saturday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.
Steve Liewer, a World-Herald writer wrote, "The scale is staggering. Laminated panels of military portraits stretching nearly the length of a football field. These are the fallen of California. More than 700 men and women from the Golden State who gave their lives during the post-9/11 wars in Iraq and Afghanistan."
Four years ago Bill and Evonne started in Nebraska to create a unique memorial of the military dead from each state. The California memorial is their 17th and latest to be completed. At least 1,000 people, most family members of the fallen, are expected to attend the opening. Before the formal service begins, each will be escorted to their service member's portrait for a moment of private grief.
Evonne told the Omaha reporter, "The day of the unveiling is like going to the funeral of a loved one. You can't sleep the night before or the night after."
Preparing the memorials has become full-time endeavor and the two estimate they are half way to their goal of a completing a memorial for each state.
Evonne is in charge of tracking down the families and obtaining both a military and personal photo for display. She has reached about 2,700 people thus far. The California project required nine months of sleuthing.
Bill lines up the sponsors to underwrite the cost of producing the panels and finds places to display them. And then volunteers must be recruited to produce the actual shows and move the panels from location to location.
After California, similar displays will be unveiled in Alabama and Indiana. They hope to complete all 50 states by the middle of next year. The three largest states, California, Texas and Florida, are now done.
They anticipate displaying the walls prepared for all 50 states in Washington, D.C. during Memorial Day weekend 2016. Then it is hoped the walls can go on a national tour much as scale replica of the Vietnam Wall does now. That wall has been to Superior.
Neither Bill nor Evonne are veterans but their four sons are. Bill is a former school teacher who met Evonne while she was a student at Byron High School.

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