THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

Sept. 22, 2016

 

 

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NEWS!

Riders follow Oregon Trail

Nelson hosts third annual country music festival

Semi driver follows GPS into the mud

Vandals damage Superior parks

 

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The Superior Express & Jewell County News 22 September 2016

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Riders follow Oregon Trail

Saturday morning, more than 60 riders gathered in Oak for the annual Oregon Trail Ride, sponsored by the Circle CTN Saddle Club. The club takes it name from the three countries in which members reside: Clay, Thayer and Nuckolls. Traditionally, the trail ride has been held the third Saturday in September before the fall harvest and after the intense heat of summer.
For at least two riders, the day did not start as planned. Shortly after being unloaded, a horse reared and fractured the arm of the rider. Other riders responded, caught the horse and CTN club members cared for the emergency.
Another horse seemed to simply not want to participate and laid down with its rider shortly after being unloaded. Fortunately, no one was hurt, but they went home.
However, for most, it was a gorgeous day. The weather was perfect for a fall ride with only a light breeze, moderate temperatures and a bright early morning sun highlighting an abundance of native fall flowers, late summer grass and ripening crops.
With an abundance of rainfall, the late season Blue stem grasses, Indian and Switch grass are especially tall and heavily seeded perhaps like the grassland earlier settlers at least dreamed of finding on the prairie.
Along the way, riders saw actual places where historical events took place. They left Oak shortly after 9 a.m. and headed north, then west through a couple of farms and then entered the Oregon Trail Ranch pasture. In 1864, it was the Eubanks Ranch, a name some still call it because of its history.
A 24 inch square bronze plaque near the green entry way gate briefly reviews the ranch history. It reads as follows:
"The Eubanks Ranch - 1864
"Continually dispossessed from their hunting grounds of time immemorial by the inevitability of the expanding frontier, the Indian tribes were pitted against settler and soldier for possession of territory, at times with untold fury and savagery.
"In August, 1864, the Cheyenne, Sioux and Arapahoe made concerted, well-organized attacks on stage stations and ranches along the Oregon-California Trail from Julesburg to the Big Sandy Station effectively stopping overland travel for two months.
"Three-fourths of a mile west of here (the Oregon Trail Ranch's green entrance gate), on the afternoon of August 7, 1864, Indians attacked and destroyed the William Eubanks ranch, killing seven members of the Eubanks family.
"Mrs. Eubanks, her three-year-old daughter, Isabelle, and six-month-old son, along with sixteen-year-old Laura Roper, who was visiting the Eubanks at the time, were taken prisoner.
"On Sept. 11, 1864, Major Wynkoop, commander of Fort Lyon, Colorado., held a council with the Cheyenne and Arapahoe on Hackberry Creek, a south branch of the Smokey Hill River. At that time, Laura Roper and Isabelle Eubanks were released by Cheyenne Chief Black Kettle and Left Hand of the Arapahoe tribe. Laura was later renunited with her family.
"In May, 1865, Sioux chiefs Two Face and Blackfoot brought a demented Mrs. Eubanks and her son in to Fort Laramie. On May 16 both Indians were hung at the fort for alleged abuse of the captives. It is believed that Isabelle Eubanks was never reunited with her mother and was adopted by a Dr. Brondsall of Denver. Isabelle never recovered from her ordeal and died shortly thereafter.
"In 1929, Laura Roper, then Mrs. Laura Vance of Oklahoma, returned here to the valley of the Little Blue to identify the site of the Eubanks Ranch and place of her capture. Markers now locate these sites.
"Research, signing and funding by the:Oregon-California Trails Association
"August ,1988 This is part of your American heritage. Honor it, protect it preserved it for your children."
Most of the 60 riders missed the small sign as bigger things attracted their attention. A herd of black Angus cows with calves and a bull ran toward the riders about a quarter of mile into the pasture, then stopped and appeared to simply watch the intruders.
Three quarters mile to the west is the Narrows, a place known on the frontier as a narrow, dangerous path along the Little Blue River.
At noon they stopped at the Gary Culbertson pasture located along the river south of Angus. There they rested and watered their horses and ate a catered meal. Before leaving the pastures, prizes donated by area business firms were awarded.
The pastured stop has large shade trees to rest and eat under and farmers bring in their flat bed trailers which provide a place to tie the horses and provide a picnic atmosphere.
CTN members play a crucial role in making the trail ride a success. Some send invitations and care for promoting the event. They also take reservations, plan the meal and secure permission from land owners. Others ride the trail ahead of time making sure there is no barb wire and other dangerous entanglements along the trail. CTN members leads the ride and two others bring up the tail, making sure no one gets lost and closing all the gates. Yet another mans a pickup and trailer to care for emergency situations and provide pickup service if needed. The town of Oak was heavily flagged to encourage horsemen to stay off local yards and park only in permitted areas. At the end of the day, a cleanup crew scoops any horse manure left in Oak from the village streets and park.
"It's lots of work," Rhonda Jeager said. "There are only about six of us who put it together, so this may be the last trail ride. I don't know."

 

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Nelson hosts third annual country music festival

Nelson streets were busier than usual over the week. Late Friday Country Music performers rolled into Nelson, mostly in campers and filled the camping facilities with hookups in the Nelson city park. Two parked at the Jim and Becky Woerner residence, one at the Nuckolls County Fair Grounds.
Saturday morning, as the volunteers, sound personnel and musicians set up the auditorium for the third annual Country Music Fest, the Thrift Store opened for a "dime and bake sale." All clothing was a dime and several women from the Nelson Community United Church of Christ had baked for the event.
The Nelson Country Music Fest featured Bobby Awe, Mary Channer Paul and Molly, Jay Kelly, Mike and Julie Couch, Curt and Debbie Pfeil and W. Douglas Hyler. The Pauls have won the Traditional Gospel Music Association Award this year and Kelly the Life Achievement Award from the National Country Music Association.
Three major show segments were planned: Saturday afternoon was the Country Jamboree. The evening program featured patriotic music and Sunday afternoon the performers played gospel. Besides music the show featured several humorous skits.
Eighty-seven sponsors from 11 surrounding communities helped finance the event or provided door-prizes. Communities represented were Nelson, Superior, Hebron, Edgar, Ruskin, Deshler, Hardy, Blue Hill, Lawrence, Fairfield and Deweese.
Jim and Becky Woerner spear headed the planning since Tex and Mary Schultz retired. In previous years they assisted. Mr. and Mrs .Schultz were season performers and had played at similar events for 13 years in Hastings. Woerners are avid country music fans. This year, they have attended country Music festivals in Wahoo; Missouri Valley, Lamar, Iowa and Anita, Iowa. While at the festival, Jim would invite performers to Nelson.
Four couples assisted the Woerners in securing sponsors: Coke and Cindy Troudt, Lawrence; Steve and Debbra Troudt, Nelson; Bob and Willa Keim, Ruskin; and Howard and Sam Mills, Hebron. In addition, Larry and Nancy Ceder, Smith Center, Kan., ran errands and took tickets over the weekend in Nelson.
Two hundred people attended the event. Between each group a five to 10 minute break was filled with presenting door prizes and reading the sponsor list.
Sunday dinner was served next door at the Nelson Community Center for a free will offering.

 

 

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Semi driver follows GPS into the mud
Modern electronic devices are often very helpful but sometimes old fashioned devices like maps and observation should override the directions offered by the GPS based navigation devices. And this was demonstrated this week in the Ruskin area.
The driver of a semi-trailer truck told the farmers who came to aid, he though he was on I 36 and trying to get to I 80 when his navigational system told him to turn. Turn he did onto a rain soaked Nuckolls County road. He travelled south on 4700 Road about one and a half miles before the truck slid into the ditch and became mired in the mud. Neighboring farmers with four wheel-drive tractors were unable to pull the vehicle back onto the road and a wrecker had to be called in.
The truck driver was taken to a Hebron motel to wait for help with the proper equipment to retrieve the rig to arrive.
The incident made a mess of a road that hadn't recovered from previous rains.
When a nearby neighbor, Ava Petersen, shared this picture with The Express, she recalled the time while on a motorcycle trip a navigational system advised turning and riding up a flight of stairs. Fortunately that day, common sense prevailed and the bike rider with the GPS knew it was time to have the electronic gadget recalculate their position.
While the county road department continues to work the roads, a wet summer has left many roads in a substandard condition.

 

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Vandals damage Superior parks
This week Scott Butler, the superintendent of the Superior parks, has asked for the community help in stopping a rash of park vandalism.
Butler said since the beginning of the current school year there has been an abundance of vandalism at City Park and in park bathrooms. On a recent morning while checking and cleaning the bathrooms, he discovered someone had smeared the entire woman's side of the scout cabin bathroom with mud, and had filled the toilets with mud. Consequently, the bathrooms are now closed.

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