THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

Dec. 18, 2014

 

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NEWS!

Merchants plan festive night downtown on Monday

Convicted murderer gets life in prison

Donated bicycles refurbished for Christmas giving

Board may seek new bids for proposed sheriff's addition

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The Superior Express 18 December 2014

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Merchants plan festive night downtown on Monday

In early December of 1914 The Express reported a woman told the editor she liked the idea of a municipal Christmas tree and public entertainment and hoped Superior would have the same that year but she supposed Superior leaders would wait until Nelson pulled it off and then get in.
We don't know if it was because of her suggestions but sometimes a large Christmas tree was located in the center of Central Street and decorated with colored lights.
Now we have the tradition of Candy Cane Lane and hay rack rides through Lincoln Park and Monday evening, downtown merchants will sponsor their "Once Upon a Christmas" open house with a number of fun things to do and see. The event was a popular one last year and this year the merchants have added several new activities and are looking forward to hosting their customers on Monday evening.
The way the business community observes the holiday changes through the years. Beginning in the 1950s and continuing about 30 years, Santa Claus and his motorized sleigh visited Superior once or twice every Christmas season. For most of those years the sleigh was operated by two Nuckolls County residents, Cliff Grove and Eugene Karmazin. At the height of their business they had two sleighs operating.
The Chamber of Commerce also brought Santa to town one Saturday afternoon riding on the American LaFrance fire truck. After a circle through the downtown area, Santa went to the City Auditorium where he took last minute requests and with the assistance of storekeepers, passed out candy sacks. Several hundred youngsters visited with Santa, some years the number exceeded a thousand.
Some communities have long traditions of sponsoring lighted Christmas parades. Superior tried for several years but often had bad luck with the weather. Frequently the designated night was bitterly cold. Occasionally, snow messed with the parade plans. With today's battery operated LED lights it would be easier than in the days when generators were required to power the lights.
One year a light snow was falling as the Methodist Bell Choir gave a concert. The temperature was mild and people had a good time that year being out and about in downtown Superior.
Over the years large sums of money have been invested in lighted displays for the downtown area but old timers agree none have been more magical than the lights which arched over main street. Those lights were used prior to the installation of the current light poles. Nearly 20 years after the new light poles made them obsolete, Vernon McBroom, the chamber of commerce's Christmas lighting chairman, was searching for a way to reclaim that magic.
Costly decorations were stretched across eight intersections. In some locations poles had to be installed for the decorations (one of those poles has become the Home Federal flag pole) but the decorations were hard to maintain. Some were damaged by snow removal work. Others fell victim to ice storms.
The Superior Jaycees used to sponsor Christmas lighting contests. But during the Arab oil embargo, Christmas lights were left dark.
In more recent years most of the emphasis has been on Candy Cane Lane. Volunteers give many hours each year to setting up, maintaining and taking down the elaborate display which attracts visitors from a wide radius around Superior.
This years plans are to have the lights burning in Lincoln Park's Candy Cane Lane from 6 to 9 p.m. through New Year's Eve.
This week The Express contains an advertising page promoting the Once Upon a Christmas event scheduled for 5 to 8 p.m. Monday.
The last in the season's Superior Bucks drawing was held Monday morning at the Superior Chamber of Commerce office at which time the names of four people were drawn. Each will receive Superior Bucks valued at $100. The winners were Monica Montgomery, Guide Rock, Murlene Schleufer, Nelson, Carolyn Barnes and Sonya Romersheuser, Superior.
For last minute gift givers the Chamber of Commerce office has Superior Bucks for sale in $5 denominations. The Bucks work like checks and can be redeemed at participating Superior business firms.

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Convicted murderer gets life in prison

A former Guide Rock resident convicted of killing a 68-year-old Guide Rock woman last year has been sentenced to life in a Nebraska prison.
Andrew J. Casterline, 24, appeared in Webster County District Court for sentencing on Monday.
A jury earlier found him guilty in the stabbing death of Virginia Barone at her Guide Rock home on Oct. 4, 2013. His mother, Shelley Casterline, 41, earlier entered a guilty plea to second -degree murder and was sentenced on Sept. 22 to life in prison.
District Judge Stephen Illingworth
noted the 22 sharp force injuries and evidence that indicated Barone was alive when she was covered in flooring boards before Casterline and his mother left the house.
Illingworth also sentenced Caster-line to 49 to 50 years consecutive to the life sentence for use of a deadly weapon to commit a felony and another 19 to 20 years for burglary, also to be served consecutive to the weapons charge.

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Donated bicycles refurbished for Christmas giving

By Marty Pohlman
John Price, Jr., had an idea and it went downhill, in a very good way, quickly. He thought about the freedom and pleasure riding bicycles had given him since he was a youth, He also realized that there were children and adults who were not fortunate enough, for many varied reasons, to obtain a bicycle. He spoke with his wife, Clara, about converting a small area of his workshop into a bicycle renovation area.
He placed a post on Facebook asking area residents to donate any unused or unwanted bicycles to his fledgling project which he named the New Life Bike Project. His thought was some bicycles could be renovated with parts from other unusable bicycles. He was unprepared for the response. It appeared there was a large number of such bicyles which donors were more than willing to part with.
From a corner of his workshop, his repair space now includes his whole workshop along with storage areas in the greenhouse and a large lean-to. Price, Jr. has invested in many specialty tools to facilitate his repair and restoration work. He can perform wheel straightening on a specialized machine. He has established contacts with parts wholesalers to provide him with items not found on the bicycle which he salvages for parts.
To step into his workshop is to step into a world of wheels. Every item and bicycle is neatly stowed. He hand fashioned adjustable stands to hold the bicycles in various positions while is working on them. Peg boards on the walls hold the tools of the trade. Clear storage bins allow quick identification of needed parts. New tires hang from racks as do bicycles in various stages of repair.
Candidates for the refurbished bicycles are by referral from Jana Chase at the Community Action Center in Superior and Janice Reinke of the HOPE Pregnancy Center. Candidates for donations can be referred to these agencies. Additional names will be gathered from the giving trees located throughout Nuckolls County.
Price, has already sent 25 bicycles to new homes. He has completed refurbishment of 25 of the 30 he hopes will be distributed at Christmas.
A tour of his shop reveals another room filled with donor bikes. They will be sorted and some will be suitable candidates for restoration while others will continue to contribute with their parts. Some bikes are badly damaged yet still contain serviceable parts. No donated bicycle is ever sold.
Price has also branched out into repairing bicycles for the public. He is also in the process of purchasing and restoring quality used bicycles for resale. He recently completed the purchase of 40 such machines. They are all higher end machines which he will refurbish and sell from his shop, Crazy Woman Bike and Bones Cycle Shop. His favorites are Schwinns and he also has two tandem bicycles which will soon be restored to pristine con dition.
Thanks to the generosity of community members, more than 200 bicycles have been donated. He has more than 100 which are candidates for renewal but the need is always there for more bicycles. He stressed that no donated bicycles are or ever will be sold.
The future may include the sale of new machines but the emphasis now is on readying the bicycles for Christmas delivery for those who will soon enjoy the exhilaration of riding down the street and out into the country.
If you have a machine you wish to donate or would like to volunteer to assist with the restoration project contact Price, Jr. at the Crazy Woman Bike and Bone Shop located at Crazy Woman Lodge, Superior.

 

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Board may seek new bids for proposed sheriff's addition
The Nuckolls County Board will have to readvertise for bids for a proposed addition to the sheriff's department building. Bids were due to be opened and reviewed at Monday's regular meeting, however none were received that met the county's standard for bid submission. One bid was properly sealed and delivered by U.S. Mail, but it was received after Friday's deadline; two bids arrived by FAX. The county does not accept bids by FAX.
Among those present for the bid opening were Brad Baker, sheriff-elect; Wim Kersten from Berggren Architects in Lincoln, who designed the building and provided the bid specifications; and county attorney Tim Schmidt.
Baker said he thought the addition as designed was too expensive and the bid process "shut out" local contractors. Arnold Brown, board chairman, countered by saying local contractors are rarely willing or able to comply with the regulations involved with bidding a project like this with the county.
"Maybe some of those standards can be changed so local contractors can bid," Baker said.
Kersten said he thinks the county's hands are tied pertaining to the aspects of the bid process that typically prevent local contractors from bidding. Brown explained the board's problems in the past with trying to maintain and improve the historic buildings without the use of an architect.
"If Nuckolls County tries to go cheap on this addition, they'll regret it down the road," Brown cautioned. He then asked Kersten whether or not he thought the building could be designed within the guidelines of a specific budget. Kersten said he wasn't sure if they could get the facility they need and want by starting with a set dollar amount.
"We looked at the size of the addition, the proposed use and requirements of the structure and the various work needed to prepare the building site," Kersten said. "The dollars are what they are."
Baker asked if the board is "locked in" to the plans prepared by Berggren. He was told nothing has been decided yet. Baker then said he didn't want to set a new date for bid-letting. He would rather wait until the board reorganizes on Jan. 8 and discuss the project with the new board. Commissioners Mike Combs and Arnold Brown are being replaced after the next meeting.
Royce Gonzales, clerk of the district court, presented a monthly report from the county safety committee. He said the committee is still trying to schedule recertification in CPR training for county employees.
Gonzales also said he believes the large spruce trees on the courthouse grounds have become a safety concern and they should probably be taken out.
"Even though it will probably cause a public relations issue, they have grown too tall," Gonzales said.
Chairman Arnold Brown said he agrees. "They've far outlived the purpose for which they were planted, landscaping-wise," he said.
In other business:
· Arnold Brown reminded Gary Warren, county highway superintendent, to have his motorgrader operators "knock down" the washboards on some of the worst roads. He said with all the moisture lately, this is a good time for it.
· An executive session was held to discuss a personnel matter. Included were the three commissioners; commissioner-elect Doyle Christensen; Gary Warren, county highway superintendent; Cindy Buescher, road department secretary; and Carrie Miller, county clerk.
· The board approved renewing the annual contract with Power System Maintenance for maintaining the county's main server in the courthouse basement. The contract renewal amount is $1,131.67.

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