THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

Nov. 15, 2018

 

 

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NEWS!

Christensen out as county commissioner

New cemetery flags honor military branches

Deadline tomorrow for Superior survey

Snow is unwelcome guest for Winter Awareness Day

 

 

The Cyber Express-Record

Digital reproductions of the mailed pages of The Superior Express and Jewell County Record newspapers are organized by date of publication. Click the link below:

The Superior Express & Jewell County Record 15 November 2018

THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS and JEWELL CO NEWS Complete Editions Pages

Unofficial election results for Nuckolls County:

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Christensen out as county commissioner

Nuckolls County election results for statewide races were not surprising: Republicans were favored over Democrats.
The following Republicans were overwhelmingly favored in the county: Deb Fischer, U.S. Senate; Adrian Smith, Congress Dist. 3; Pete Ricketts and Mike Foley, gov. and lt. gov.; Bob Evnen, sec. of state; John Murante, state treasurer; Doug Peterson, attorney general; Charlie Janssen, auditor of public accounts. Some were opposed. Some were not.
For county elected officials, the biggest story is Republican James Keifer unseated Doyle Christensen, the Democratic incumbent for county commissioner, district 1. The vote count was 305 to 246 in favor of the challenger. Commissioner Tim Zikmund staved off a write-in challenger for his district 3 seat, 490 to 64. The following incumbents, all Republicans, were reelected: Carrie Miller, county clerk; Royce Gonzales, clerk of the district court; Vicki Ensign, treasurer; Brad Baker, sheriff; Susan Rogers, assessor. Republican John Hodge, recently appointed by the commissioners, won his first election to the position of county attorney. He was unopposed.
For the nonpartisan Nebraska Legislature, District 38, county voters favored Dave Murman over Marsha Fangmeyer, 982 to 642.
For Superior mayor, incumbent Sonia Schmidt was reelected with 398 votes. A total of 311 write-in votes were cast against her. Carrie Lemke, Steve Fox and Rick Disney were all elected to the Superior City Council.
Arlan Drudik was reelected mayor of Nelson; Doug Porter was elected to the Nelson City Council.
Complete county election results are available at the above link.

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New cemetery flags honor military branches

By Sandra Foote
There are new flag poles and flags in the west portion of Evergreen Cemetery in Superior, representing the four branches of the military. It all started last year when someone who owns plots near some old bushes talked to Scott Butler, Superior's park and cemetery superintendent, about the possible removal of the bushes.
The bushes were apparently crowding out headstones and also had bagworms, so Butler began to think about replacing them with flags. He took his idea to the city park board and it was approved unanimously. Superior Park Board members are Spencer Trapp, president; Jana Marr, secretary; Diane Krotzinger, Ashley Clark and Karen Rothfuss.
Butler then checked with Sam Clark, Superior's comptroller, to see if funds were available for the purchase and installation of the flag poles. Sam said funds were available, and the process was put into motion. Last month, the bushes were removed by a tree service, which left space and the flag poles were put in. Lighting for the flags will soon be installed. Power will need to be trenched in from the highway for the west cemetery.
Butler said he is not a veteran, but that he's a "happy American," with friends and family members who are veterans.
"I am thankful for all our veterans," he said.

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Deadline tomorrow for Superior survey

Earlier this year, the City of Superior contracted with Bobbi Pettit of Five Rule Rural Planning to complete a pedestrian transportation and storm-water management study of the city. As part of an ongoing, collaborative effort to promote walkability, the city is determining the best locations for infrastructure upgrades intended to make walking a safer and more convenient option than it is today. 
The focus on improving walkability has brought to the forefront that much of the sidewalk system in Superior is lacking, and the current condition of the sidewalk system discourages people from walking for transportation, not merely recreation. 
Improving the pedestrian transportation infrastructure in Superior is no small task  as there are many expensive variables to consider. The primary purpose of the study is to identify projects that will provide the biggest improvements for the largest amount of users. The community is being asked to assist with the project identification and prioritization process. 
In September, two public meetings were held in Superior in order to ask the community what parts of the city's pedestrian transportation system needed the most attention. One was at Brodstone Memorial Hospital on the afternoon of Sept. 12; the other was the same evening at Superior High School. A list of values and a list of projects were developed as a result of those meetings. 
The community is  now being asked to provide input as to which values and projects should receive the most attention when trying to re-establish the pedestrian transportation system in Superior. Part of that input will be in the form of responses to a walkability survey being circulated, "Talking About Walking."
The survey is available through tomorrow (Friday) and may be taken online at talkingaboutwalking.com. Paper copies are also available at the city office, municipal library, Vestey Center or Brodstone Memorial Hospital. They must be turned in by tomorrow (Friday) at any of the same locations.
Questions on the survey ask respondents their age range, how long they've lived in the area and where they live in proximity to Superior. It then asks respondents to rate the following in terms of importance: accessibility, connectivity, safety, the ability to run and walk in town without hinderance and having walking paths around parks and ballfields.
It also asked respondents to rank several public works projects based on what they believe will make the biggest impact in improving walkability in Superior.

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Snow is unwelcome guest for Winter Awareness Day

The National Weather Service has designated today (Thursday) as Winter Awareness Day. As a result, the service has distributed information offering advice on what residents of the Midlands should do to prepare for driving and living on the plains during the winter months. And that is fine. If long term residents didn't already know how to cope with winter on the plains, they wouldn't be long-term residents. Newcomers will either learn quickly or move on.
What the weather service didn't need to do was punctuate Winter Awareness Day with snow. But at this writing, it looks almost certain that is going to happen.
Accumulating snowfall is forecast across the entire area served by this newspaper. Weather forecasters have predicted rain will move into the area from the west on Wednesday and transition to snow during the overnight hours. Snow is to continue through the daytime hours of today (Thursday).
Much colder temperatures are expected to accompany the snow. Highs Friday are not expected to reach above the freezing mark.
Slick roadways will be possible because of the falling snow. Reductions in visibility will also be possible in areas where the snowfall rate is higher. Wind is not expected to be a major problem.
On Tuesday, the weather service said confidence in snow falling is high. Confidence in the amount is medium as even small changes in the track or transition from rain to snow can have a notable impact on amounts.
While one to two inches are expected in this area, the weather service said as many as five inches are possible.
This storm is only one of a series of weather events stressing farmers trying to bring in their fall harvest.
While recent rainfall amounts have been light, they have been enough to slow the harvest. Fields were soaked by the above normal rainfall in October and only a few hundredths of an inch of rain now makes it difficult to operate harvest equipment.
Most farmers appear to have gotten their soybeans out before they shattered but it will take a week or more of good weather to complete the corn and milo harvest.
Grain prices are depressed but the soybean market appears to be the hardest hit by the trade wars which have disrupted normal export markets.
Local elevator operators are having a hard time finding a market for soybeans. In recent years, many of the beans produced in this area have been shipped to China but this year China is not buying American raised soybeans and alternative markets have not yet been developed.
There continues to be an export market for corn and much of the corn coming to the elevators at Superior is being exported to Mexico.
Five years ago, corn was selling for $4.17 a bushel and soybeans for $12.17 a bushel. Last year corn had declined to $3.11 but beans were selling for nearly three times as much at $9.01. Beans need to sell for more than corn as they yield fewer bushels per acre. Tuesday morning the corn market in Superior was offering $3.44 per bushel while beans were selling for only $7.49 per bushel.