THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

Aug. 28, 2014

 

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NEWS!

City council delays salary discussion to address smoking

Headrick homestead still in family after 140 years

State park visitors find plenty of water this weekend

County board approves sick leave bank program

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The Superior Express 28 August 2014

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City council delays salary discussion to address smoking

Members of the Superior City Council, after learning that at least one city employee has been smoking in a city-owned vehicle Monday evening tabled consideration of a pay raise and went into executive session to discuss personnel matters.
The motion to freeze wage discussions for the fiscal year which begins Oct. 1 was introduced by Councilman Kent Jensby and second by Councilman Bob Tipton.
Mayor Sonia Schmidt reviewd the employee manual and said thee outlined procedure for those violating the rules was to first issue a verbal warning followed by a written warning and finally suspension. An employee safety meeting is scheduled for next week at which time the city tobacco use policy will be reviewed.
In other action the council decided to change contractors engaged to bring the public restroom in the public safety building into compliance with disabilities act.
Currently the building built in the 1970s has both a men's and women's restroom but neither are handicapped accessible. They will be replaced with one handicapped accessbile restroom serving both men and women. The Wood Doctor agreed to start the work by Nov. 1 and complete the project for $7,000.
Dwayne Bostelman and Bob Sloane met with the council to explore the possible construction of a storage building to house Candy Cane Lane materials. Currently the items used by the Candy Cane Lane group are stored in two semi-trailers parked in Lincoln Park and other locations throughout Superior. The trailers are not permitted by city ordinance and an alternative needs to be found.
Bostelman asked if the city might be willing to provide land for the building. If contructed near the present park maintenance building, Bostelman proposed the building elevation be raised 24 inches to make sure it was out of the flood plain.
It is thought a building 30 x 50 with 14-foot sidewalls and one 10 foot door would be adequate.
Bostelman said the committee had some money on hand but more would be needed.
Mayor Schmidt said the building was a good idea and said the council would be willing to continue discussions, however, a number of questions have to be answered.
Bostelman said the park board had not been approached and he wasn't sure of the board's position with regard to the project.
Members of the council voted unamiously to proceed with plans to install underground electrical wiring, and a sprinkler system on the vacant lot located west of the city office building. Trees suitable for a downtown location will also be planted on the lot.
A resident of the city had asked for an opportunity to appear before the council with regard to the city not picking up limbs blown down during last week's storm. However, he did not attend the meeting.
Mayor Sonia Schmidt said she made the decision to not pickup limbs after consulting with city staff members. She said impatient city residents were calling the city office wanting to know what the city was going to do before staff members had an opportunity to determine how extensive the damage was. With the information available at that time, Schmidt said it appeared the assistance of the city crew was not needed to clear the city. By the time more information was available a number of residents had contracted help in removing their limbs.

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Headrick homestead still in family after 140 years

Descents of Nathan Wesley Headrick gathered at the site of his 1874 homestead at 10 a.m. Saturday morning to dedicate a monument honoring this event. The Headrick Homestead is one a few homesteads that remain with the founding families. The homestead has been owned by three generations so far. Members of the third, fourth, fifth and six generations were present Saturday to celebrate the 140 years the family has owned the farm located on the divide three miles south of the Kansas-Nebraska Stateline and about a half-mile west of Highway 14.
Since the original homestead, the family has added additional land in what has become known as Jewell County's Olive Hill Community.
Nathan Wesley Headrick left his father's home in Richardson County, Nebraska, as a teenager and joined a cattle drive on the Chisholm Trail. According to his daughter, the late Eva Green, "When he first saw sunny Kansas he made up his mind to homestead there as soon as he was 21. He saved his money and did just that in 1874.
The original 160 acres are located in the center portion of what is now Headrick land. Farming was important of course, but raising and feeding cattle became the most important part of the operation and continued so until about 1980.
Nathan married Sarah Tibbits at her family's dugout home on May 29, 1878. They raised five sons and two daughters, and in 1893 built a large Victorian-style home down the hill a short distance from the monument erected on the top of the hill earlier this summer. Sadly, the house was struck by lighting and burned to the ground about 80 years ago.
A son of Nathan's, Clyde Edward, was the second owner with his wife, Ethel Warren. Their son, Clyde Wendell Headrick, married Esther Phillips of Norton County, and became the third owner. The land currently remains with his heirs.
There are many exciting tales of both great and tragic events associated with the ownership of the land.
Though Superior is visible from the Headrick homestead, Nathan Headrick claimed the land a year before William Louden proposed the establishment of Superior. Jewell County was established in 1871, Nuckolls County in 1872.
The Olive Hill community was beginning to form about the time Headrick chose his homestead.
A subscription school was established in 1875. The Olive Hill Church was established in a dugout about a mile south and two and a half miles west of the Headrick homestead in 1876, the same year the Olive Hill Cemetery was established a half mile south and a mile and half or so west of the Headrick home.
Clyde and Ethel Headrick raised five children in the Olive Hill Community. Only Rex is living. Saturday he and Wendell's wife, Esther, represented the third generation of the family with ties to the homestead. Rex has been a farmer and cattleman in the Jewell area. Esther is now retired and living in Manhattan. Steve and Jane Headrick are living on the farm just across the road south of the monument.
Descendents of Clyde's children, Rex, Wayne, Doris and Wendell, were present for the dedication Saturday. Clyde and Ethel had one more son. Omar, who was a WWII casualty.
Friends and neighbors also joined in the celebration.
Steve and Jane Headrick thought the family members were returning to this area because of the monument. However, the family had planned a surprise. Friday night they gathered at the Superior Country Club to honor Steve and Jane for their 38th wedding anniversary.
After the dedication, the family gathered in the recently remodelled Headrick barn.
It was noted Saturday morning 13 children had been raised on the homestead and it had been home to at least 30 people.

 

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State park visitors find plenty of water this weekend

While attendance is the smallest of the three summer holidays at Lovewell State Park, Labor Day has tradtionally been one of the big weekends for the park.
In the early years of the park, the lake had reached it low point of the season in early August and refilled sufficiently for Labor Day to make for good boating.
With declining stream flows, that hasn't been the case in recent years. Many times there have been vast expanses of exposed lake bottom. Boats had to be anchored "out there somewhere" and the occupants had to wade through the mud to reach their campsite. That won't be the case this year. Recent rains have reduced the demand for late season irrigation water and inflows have remained strong.
Because of low stream flows, managers of Nebraska lakes in the Republican watershed have been forbidden to held any water. Stream flows must be passed through to Kansas.
Monday Harlan County Reservoir was releasing 300 cubic feet per second, as it has done most of the summer, while inflow was only 134.3 c.f.s. The lake was said to be 47 percent full. The elevation was 1,930.7 feet, down from a conservation pool top of 1,945.7 feet.
On Monday Lovewell was receiving 325 cubic feet per second and releasing only 176.2 c.f.s. The lake was reported to be 74 percent full. The elevation was 1,579.2. Conservation pool top is 1,582.6.
With rain in the forecast this week, the lake level may be even higher by the weekend.

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County board approves sick leave bank program
The Nuckolls County Board at Monday's regular meeting approved a program designed to help employees with long-term illnesses or serious injuries. "Sick leave banks" have become popular components of health benefits among entities with a large number of employees. The board's action allows for the implementation of such a plan along with modification of the county's personnel manual.
When an employee suffers from an illness or injury requiring extensive medical treatment and exhaustion of that person's earned sick leave, coworkers will now be able to help by donating their unused sick leave, for use until the employee is able to return to work.
The county's sick leave bank will be available upon satisfaction of the following conditions:
· The employee must have exhausted all accrued paid leave, including sick leave, vacation and compensatory time off.
· The illness or injury must be that of the employee personally.
· The employee must produce medical verification from a physician in order to verify eligibility. No more than 480 hours of donated sick leave will be granted to an employee.
· The county will protect the privacy of employees who receive donated sick leave. Only those with a legitimate need to know will be apprised of an employee's status as a recipient.
· Misrepresenting the need for leave or abuse of donated sick leave may result in the offending employee having to repay all or part of the donated sick leave, as well as being subjected to disciplinary action, up to and including termination.
To apply for donated sick leave, the employee must do the following:
· An eligible employee must complete the donated sick leave request form and submit it to the department head, along with a statement from the physician supporting the need for the leave. A committee consisting of the employee's department head, the county board chairman and the county attorney will either approve or deny the application.
· The first approval for donated leave will be for a maximum of 320 hours, followed by a review by the committee. In accordance with the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, the maximum amount of donated leave an employee receives shall not exceed 12 weeks, or 480 hours.
· To continue receiving donated sick leave, the employee must provide medical verification by the fifth day of each month the employee is absent from work and receiving donated leave.
· Unused donated leave will be returned to the sick leave bank pool.
All that remains before the county's sick leave bank program is implemented is creation of the donated sick leave request form by the county attorney.

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