THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

Feb. 4, 2016

 

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NEWS!

Superior Council asked to link parks with walking path

More winter weather may be on the way

Pawnee Bridge coming down

Fire departments assist with Guide Rock clean-up

The Cyber Express-Record

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The Superior Express & Jewell County News 4 February 2016

THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS and JEWELL CO NEWS Complete Editions Pages

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Superior Council asked to link parks with walking path

Though the property owner had asked the City of Superior to stay an abatement order issued earlier on a property on South National, members of the city council noted the property had been on the troubled property location for three years. While the structure has been gutted and some repair work commenced, during this time frame the volume of inappropriate materials stored on the lot has increased. The owner was given 30 days to bring the property into compliance with city statues. If that doesn't happen the city may proceed to correct the problems and assess clean up costs.
In a related action another property was added to the nuisance list. The five council members present Monday evening voted unanimously to add the property at 204 West Third Street to the list.
Three property owners were present to report on what they were doing. The owner of 530 Park said most of the unauthorized material had been removed from the yard. A new door had been hung on the house earlier that day. A new electrical service panel had been installed but the electrician had not had the property connected to the city service.
The owner of 654 Dakota, reported most the debris left after the house was knocked down had been hauled away. He said the floor and foundation would not be removed until after the spring thaw. He explained he planned to leave the floor as a covering over the basement until such time as the foundation could be removed and the hole filled. He said the floor was solid and would prevent youngsters from enter the area beneath the floor.
The owner of a demolished garage located between Fifth and Sixth Street said a semi would be on site this week to haul away the rubble.
It was reported an engineering firm had inspected Public Safety Building's fire truck fill station. Repair of the leaking system has an estimated $35,000 price tag and is not part of this year's planned city expenditures. Members of the fire department and the city council will review the engineer's report before deciding what the next step should be.
Permission was granted Central National Bank to install a handicapped accessible parking area near the front of the bank. Doing so will eliminate the two 30-minute parking stalls now located near the bank's front entrance. The curb will be cut and a ramp installed.
Members of the council took under advisement a suggested walking path to connect City and Lincoln parks. The parks are located 6.5 blocks away and the walking path will connect with the Safe Route to School project planned for Lincoln Park.
Superior is among a handful of Nebraska communities selected to participate in a walking program being administered by the state's regional health departments.
As part of the program, the council was asked to ban parking along the south side of Sixth Street from Park to Bloom streets and paint a six-inch-wide stripe designating the area currently used for parking as a walking trail. The cost for the paint and related signs was estimated at $3,000. If the path is not used, it was noted the area could easily be returned to its present use.
The proposal was tabled to allow council members an opportunity to inspect the proposed area and to receive comment from community residents.
As the city explores alternative energy sources, it was suggested the city consider joining the Community Energy Alliance, a nationwide movement that would help gather information and submit grant proposals.

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More winter weather may be on the way

Last Wednesday the storm that was to break records later in the week along the Atlantic seaboard crossed through this area. Fortunately, it was a better behaved on the Plains. However, it did bring the greatest snowfall todate this winter in this area.
Wednesday morning began as a pleasant winter day but the evidence of the highway department trucks spreading pre-treatment chemicals on the highways that morning was an indication of what was to come.
Shortly after 5 p.m. Wednesday a fast accumulating snow began falling on Superior. The snow apparently spread into Superior from the southwest as earlier in the afternoon there were reports of heavy snow and near whiteout conditions in Kansas.
Before the snow moved on east, an official 6.8 inches was measured in Superior. The snow was even heavier to the east. By the time it reached the east coast, snowfall was being measured in feet. As much as 9 inches were reported in Southern Nebraska. Hubbell reported 8 inches, Hebron 5.2. Lincoln avoided most of the snow. Little snow was reported north of Nelson.
The Superior schools started two hours late Thursday morning. School was called off at Mankato.
Additional snow fell on Superior Monday morning. While new snow covered the ground and made the streets slick, much of it melted as it fell making it difficult to measure. The snowfall was certainly an inch or less, probably less than a half-inch.
A video showing travel conditions at 8.a.m. Monday in downtown Superior was posted on this newspaper's web page before 9 a.m. Monday. At this writing, that video had set a record for the most people to watch an Express video in the 24 hours immediately following posting. Reports indicated it reached more than 3,200 viewers in the first 24 hours.
Snow returns to the forecast for this weekend. Depending upon which forecast one looks at, we have either a slight chance for more snow or look out more than we ever want is coming our way.
Yet Tuesday afternoon the weather models used to evaluate an approaching were not in agreement. All seemed to indicated there would be plenty of moisture in the atmosphere to work with but the did not agree on what would happen.
While some models placed the possibility for snow as slight, at least one predicted widespread snow over most all of Nebraska. That model indicated 14 to 20 inches was likely over most of the state with 6 to 14 inches elsewhere.
If that kind of a storm should materialize, it will certainly be one for the record books.

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Pawnee Bridge coming down
In this weeks Republic News column this newspaper's correspondent, Betty Bouray laments that an old friend, the Pawnee Bridge is being removed, but she also rejoices that later this year a new bridge will take its place.
Earlier this month a Newton, Kan., company began removing the old, one-lane bridge that first opened for traffic on April 29, 1922. Most the construction work on the Pawnee bridge was completed in 1921. The bridge was located east of the Pawnee Village Museum and made for the most direct connection between the museum and Republic.
The bridge was closed in April of 2012 after engineers detected the abutments were washing away.
The river crossing is 1 mile south and one mile west of Republic. The three-span bridge was 305 feet long with 16 feet of vertical clearance. In 2010 it was estimated the bridge had a daily traffic count of 164 vehicles. Each span was approximately 100 feet long. The bridge was one of the few that survived the 1935 flood.
It is to be replaced by a new structure costing $1.6 million. Most of that cost will be paid by the Kansas Department of Transportation. Republic County's share of that cost will be $480,000 and grants have been obtained to cover most of the county's share.
The 94-year-old Pawnee bridge replaced a bridge built in 1905 that was destroyed by the 1915 flood. While not as big as the 1935 flood, the 1915 flood washed out many Republican River bridges and was considered the valley's "Big Flood" prior to 1935.

 

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Fire departments assist with Guide Rock clean-up
Sunday morning volunteer fire departments from Nelson and Red Cloud joined with their compatriats from Guide Rock to conduct a dual purpose exercise. As a training exercise houses three houses located on High Street wee set on fire. The houses were among several previously designated for removal as part of a community improvement program.
Each the village board designates money to be used for such community improvment. Two houses were burned in an earlier exercise. Three more are on the list for another exercise.
Sunday was a near perfect day for such an exercise. The ground was covered with snow, there was little wind and for a winter day the temperature was moderate and sky clear.
The address of the top house was given as 530 High Street. The middle house was located at 535 High Street and the lower one at 420 High Street.

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