THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

Oct. 11, 2018

 

 

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NEWS!

Superior School Board learns about career pathways program

Simulation lab on wheels visits Brodstone

Fall rains keep falling; harvest at a standstill

River basin plan ready for public comment

 

 

The Cyber Express-Record

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The Superior Express & Jewell County Record 11 October 2018

THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS and JEWELL CO NEWS Complete Editions Pages

Unofficial election results for Nuckolls County:

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Superior School Board learns about career pathways program

All members of the Superior Board of Education were present Monday evening to hear a series of reports and approved September expenditures from the general fund in the amount of $486,399.
During public participation, Denise Fuller addressed the board. She asked the board of education to improve school bus safety. She reported on an incident from Sept. 17 and said her daughter has not ridden the school bus since. She said she had talked to the administration prior to coming to the meeting.
Jodi Grabast and Allison White, both teachers, gave an overview of PBIS, a student behavior positive reinforcement training program which was implement in the last couple of years. The program is data driven and has increased positive behavior, especially in the elementary school.
Principals reported on parent teacher conferences held Sept. 20. More than 90 percent of the elementary parents attended and more than 50 percent of the junior-senior high school student parents attended the conferences.
MAP testing has been completed. The Northwest Evaluation Association Measure of Academic Progress (NWEA Map Testing) is done twice a year. Grades 3-6 and 7-11 are tested twice a year. Parents will receive a student progress report showing how their child compares to other students in the same grade across the nation.
Fourth grade students attended Ag Venture Day at the Fillmore County Fairgrounds. Sessions focused on crop production, water aquifers, different types of grain and livestock raised in Nebraska. Ag Venture Day was coordinated by the Fillmore County Extension Office, FFA chapters from Fillmore Central and Sutton and the Nebraska Women's Cattlemen Association.
Fifth and sixth grade students attended the Earth Jamboree at the Clay County Fairgrounds. Activities included the following topics, crop pest control, soil conservation, a GPS scavenger hunt, Nebraska wildlife species and a junk art contest.
The Superior High School FBLA conducted a blood drive last Wednesday. Approximately 45 donors participated throughout the day. The blood drive allows the organization to award a $500 scholarship to a member of the association each year.
Oct. 10, tenth grade students will take the PSAT test to help determine the National Merritt Scholarship recipients.
Supt. Kobza reported on a Rural Schools meeting he had attended. A big portion of meeting focused on property tax relief. However, those present had little hope of policy change at the state level.
Substitute teacher qualifications in Nebraska was also discussed at the Rural Schools meeting. Kobza said, "We struggle to find substitute teachers. Nebraska requires they have a teaching degree. Nebraska has some of the toughest requirements in the nation."
Supt. Kobza also reported on the weight room and the track. Flooring has been laid this week in the weight room. However, the manufacturer is being involved in a issue in the middle of the floor which has yet to be resolved.
A truck was to come on Monday to work on the track. Temperatures must be above 40 degrees F., for them to work and the paint used for striping needs at least 50 degree temperatures.
He also reported on the development of two career pathways. Deb Hanson, an architect, has helped with ideas related to housing in Superior and a construction science program. Area contractors have also been involved. Supt. Kobza said, "We are on track to start a construction science program next fall."
Megan McMeen has received a certificate to teach a nursing assistant program. "We plan to start offering it this spring," Kobza said. "We hope to open it to adults in the area who need to be retrained."
Teresa Sullivan has encouraged the school to apply for a Revision Grant program. It possibly could provide up to $50,000 to help start career pathways. Seth Going and Sarah Fuller are working on the grant application.
The beef in school program is still looking for contributions of money or animals to provide beef for the school lunch program. Hamburger patties were grilled for Monday's lunch and will be grilled again on Oct. 31 and Nov. 5. Jason Jensen reported the organization has two beef in Diller being processed.
The meeting lasted approximately one hour. No business was conducted except for approval of the consent agenda and general expenditures.

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Simulation lab on wheels visits Brodstone

By Sandra Foote
Deb Harris, staff development director at Brodstone Memorial Hospital, said she believes education is vital to good health care. Her background is in health care simulation. While working in Steamboat Springs, Colo., she led a team that built a simulation lab. She believes simulation is the best tool to use in health care because medical personnel are able work on patients who are not actually living.
This type of learning is effective because the mannequins used in lifesaving classes are as life like as you can imagine. They simulate breathing and have a pulse in their hands and feet. Their eyes move about as if they are looking at you and the surrounding area. Each mannequin is computer operated and controlled and can be programmed for 10 different scenarios. They can be programmed to wheeze or have a crackling sound like they have fluid in their lungs. Their blood pressure can also be checked, as well as heart rate and breathing. It is up to the nursing staff to assess the symptoms and give the correct treatment for the condition simulated by the mannequin. If the treatment given is the right one, the mannequin gets better; if not, it does not get better and dies. This is a non-stressful way the health care staff can practice and, then when the time comes, they can use their knowledge with more confidence and better success for actual patients.
There are four simulator semi-trailers in Nebraska. Harris said she heard about them and contacted them for a training exercise. The simulators were inspired and funded by the Leona and Larry Helmsley foundation in New York. When the Helmsleys died, their grandson was in charge of the $3 billion foundation. He saw a great need for training of critical access hospitals and fire departments that needed training. The equipment and training are grant based projects. He began this process by building four trucks in South Dakota. Each truck has crash carts, cardiac monitor and four mannequins. The front of the trailer has an emergency room simulator and the rear has an ambulance room.
The mannequin, "Lucina," (the goddess of fertility) was the object of the lessons in Superior. Along with traumatic pulmonary symptoms she can also be pregnant and simulate having a baby. The cost of Lucina is $95,000, while the cost of the youth mannequin is $40,000.
Sometimes, students don't have much medical training, such as new firemen or EMTs. If students don't readily understand the lesson, the instructor can stop the lesson, talk casually and reset the simulation. The purpose of this type of education is to have a good experience with a positive outcome.
"We want to educate, but we also want to make this education fun for the participants," said James Staab, the facilitator of thew program.
Participants seemed enthusiastic about learning in this innovative process. "The practice simulation at Brodstone Memorial Hospital is the highest based standard. It's a cool way to provide the best training and the best information for our staff," Harris said. "I would like to have Brodstone be the hub of learning in our area."
Harris began her health care career as an LPN working with Dr. Blecha for approximately 10 years. She went back to school and then worked in Steamboat Springs, Colo. She came back to Brodstone Memorial Hospital as a respiratory therapist and has been working in staff development for about a year and a half.
EMTs, RNs and respiratory personnel participated in these exercises Sept. 27 at Brodstone.

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Fall rains keep falling; harvest at a standstill

In the first days of October a Superior resident camping at Lovewell State Park published a selfie picture on a social media site taken while sitting in the lake water. That day it seemed summer would never end.
A steady stream of grain trucks were moving past The Express taking grain to the shuttle-loading elevators located near the community's eastern boundary. The fall harvest was going well. Some farmers were having trouble finding dry grain but harvest conditions were pleasant and the yields, for most part, while not record setting were being better than expected. Prices were still low but they were moving up rather than down.
And then in a wink, the weather changed. The temperature fell and the clouds rolled in. Damp, cloudy days became the norm. While rainfall was never heavy the amount total was growing.
By Tuesday the rain was heavier and it began to feel like it would never let up.
The forecast was still calling for rain and the words "widespread frost" had been added. Clay, Webster and Smith counties were included in the freeze watch.
Farmers were worried about the fall harvest. They didn't know when they would get back in their fields but they knew when they did, it would be tough going. With the growing season at an end, shorter days and increased cloud cover, the mud would dry slowly. Hopefully, they would not have to wait for the ground to freeze before harvesting some fields.
There was the possibility the rain soaked soybeans would shatter and the harvest be lost. If it stayed wet enough for a long enough time, even the corn harvest would suffer.
They thought of Noah and the story about it raining 40 days and 40 nights. It hadn't been that long but after a week of rain, it was long enough. They recalled God's promise to never again destroy the earth with such a flood.
Early Tuesday morning the National Weather Service said the rain expected on Monday had not developed like expected, and the scope of the flood watch was reduced. Then skies opened and the multi-county flood watch was again posted.
By Tuesday afternoon it didn't make any difference from which direction the customers came. All who called at The Express were telling stories of limited visibility and ditches and streams filled with water. One driver coming in from Hardy said Highway 8 was particularly dangerous because water had filled the tracks and increased the likelihood of her vehicle hydroplaning into a ditch filled with water.
There is a chance we might see a bit of sunshine this (Thursday) afternoon but then the rain returns.
Most the rain can be described as gentle. As of this writing, we haven't had a gully washer. It hasn't rained cats and dogs. It just hasn't stopped. The ground has become saturated and the gully washer may be just over the hill. We can't tell for the sky is so dark and overcast we don't know what to expect.
Most of the rain that now falls is running off.
It looks like the weather service prediction for record breaking rainfall is on track. We entered the week with less than average rainfall for the year but that is subject to change. If the fall continues to be wet, 2018 will be a year of both drought and flood.
At 4:33 Tuesday the National Weather Service flood watch area included Webster, Nuckolls, Thayer, Smith, Jewell and Republic counties among many others to the east and south.Flood advisories and flood warnings were also posted in Kansas.
For residents of the plains, the weather can always be a story topic.

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River basin plan ready for public comment

The Upper Republican, Middle Republican, Lower Republican and Tri-Basin natural resources districts are developing a plan to to manage the basin's water resource. Public hearings are being proposed to present the plan to basin residents and take testimony either in support of or opposition to the plan.
Hearings are scheduled Nov. 13 and 14 at various locations within the basin. Meetings in this area include one at 1 p.m. Nov. 14 at the Tri-Basin office in Holdrege. Another is planned 4 p.m. Nov. 14 in the Lower Republican office at Alma.
The geographic area of the plan is the extent of the Nebraska portion of the Republican River surface water basin.
The full text of the proposed Basin-Wide Plan may be obtained via the Upper Republican NRD's website (www.urnrd.org.
Following the public hearing, the districts and the state department will make a joint decision within 60 days of whether to implement the proposed plan with or without modifications.