SUBSCRIBE

FRONT PAGE

 MORE NEWS

 FEATURES

 OBITUARIES

 ADVERTISING

 Headline News

 SPORTS

 COLUMNS

 JEWELL

 

MORE NEWS FROM

THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

From our early files

Nuckolls County Courthouse news

County Board approves purchase of 4x4 backhoe tractor

Brick from Guide Rock School leads to award-winning story

Scroll to the bottom of this page for stories from the Nebraska News Service


From our early files

Eighty Years Ago
Henry Paulsen, a farmer who lived west of Superior, was in Brodstone Memorial Hospital with two badly crushed legs. He did not believe the mechanic at a Superior service station who informed him that a tractor wheel, the old metal type, weighed 1,800 pounds. He tried to heft one tire by himself and learned the painful truth.
Ira Sheets, owner of Valley Lumber Company, moved the company headquarters to Superior. He had been based in Holdrege but he sold his interest in the yard there but retained the Superior yard and three others.
Mrs. G. W. Harrington celebrated her 91st birthday.
The drought persisted from the past summer with more dust storms and no rain or snow.
Fresh Louisiana strawberries were two pints for 25 cents at R. J. Stephenson's Superior grocery store.
The Lyric Theatre was playing "The Cat and the Fiddle," starring Ramon Navarro and Jeanette McDonald.
Seventy Years Ago
Soren and Ervin Thomsen, Bostwick, were serving in the United States Army. Soren was stationed in Florida and Ervin was stationed in Australia,
The first meeting of the Victory Chick club was held at Superior City Auditorium.
The Rev. F. Geiswinkler, the pastor of Salem Lutheran Church, accepted a call to the pastorate of the Lutheran church of Rosalie.
Elwood Harvey, Superior, was home on leave from the United States Navy. He served on the U.S.S. Nassau in the Pacific.
Ground beef was 24 cents and 6 ration points per pound at the Superior Safeway.
The Lyric Theatre was showing "Desert Song," starring Dennis Morgan and Irene Manning.
Sixty Years Ago
Vee Fringer, 16, died in an automobile accident. She was a junior at Guide Rock High school and was a passenger in a car driven by her brother, Douglas, who was seriously injured.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Vandeveer, Superior, celebrated their 53rd wedding anniversary.
Donald Giger, 15, died. He was a Superior High School student.
Larry Weeks, Superior, was elected president of the Nebraska Grain and Feed Dealers Association.
A 25 pound bag of Duncan Hines flour was $1.99 at Superior's Ideal Market.
The Crest Theatre was playing "It Should Happen to You," starring Judy Holliday and Peter Lawford.
Fifty Years Ago
Herman Hoelting, 56, died when his pick-up truck rolled. He was a lifelong Lawrence resident and a WWII veteran.
Five contestants vied for the title of Miss Superior at the pageant held at the Crest Theatre. Bonnie Jo Brown was the winner of the crown.
Fred Day and Howard Nicholson were honored with their Masonic 50 year pins.
Sharon Gerdes an eighth grader in Peace Lutheran School at Deshler won the Midwest Spelling Contest, sponsored by the Omaha World-Herald, and received an all-expense paid trip to the National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C.
Farmers State Bank in Superior was paying four per cent interest on one year certificates of deposit.
The Crest Theatre was showing "Lilies of the Field," starring Sidney Poitier.
Forty Years Ago
A tornado swept across Nuckolls County causing building damage and loss of livestock. Damage was heaviest in the Ruskin area.
The Superior Airport office and the Byfield Garage on East Second Street were broken into.
Henry Rempe, 84, died. He was a lifelong Nuckolls County resident.
The Nebraska Department of Roads has received approval from the Federal Highway Administration for the installation of railroad crossing signals at the Burlington Northern Railroad crossing on U.S. Highway 136 At Amboy.
Sliced bacon was 99 cents per pound at Superior's Ideal Market.
The Crest Theatre was showing "Busting."
Thirty Years Ago
A Republican City truck driver avoided a collision with a semi-trailer truck on the Abdal Road but collided with a Missouri Pacific Railroad train. No one was injured but the truck was extensively damaged.
Dr. and Mrs. Claude Mason celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.
The Rev. Frank Machovec, pastor of St. Joseph Church of Superior, celebrated the 25th anniversary of his ordination.
Ernest Wade, 84, died. He was a longtime resident of the Davenport-Oak area.
Ectrin ear tags were one dollar each at Paul's Feed in Hardy.
The Crest Theatre was showing "Footloose."
Twenty Years Ago
Vernon and Halle Grummert, Nelson, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.
The Nebraska state quilt was coming to Superior for the first Lady Vestey Quilt Show.
Leonard Ebsen, 82, died. He was a retired famer and stockman near Bostwick for many years.
Hope Ohmstede, 73, died. She was and her husband owned and operated Glenn's Mini-Max in Guide Rock.
A 12 pack of Pepsi or Pepsi products was $2.59 at Superior's Jack and Jill Food Center.
The Crest Theatre was playing "On Deadly Ground," and "8 seconds."
Ten Years Ago
An air quality project at Superior Junior-Senior High School was postponed when bids were $190,000 over the projected cost.
Ruby Ebsen, 96, died. She was a longtime Nuckolls County resident.
Worthy Tomlinson, 80, died. He was a Nelson High School graduate and a WWII veteran.
Representatives of a German film crew were in Superior gathering material for a documentary on life in America.
The Crest Theatre was playing "The Prin ce and Me" and "Hildago."
Five Years Ago
The Angus bridge project was completed.
Glen Koester, Lawrence, celebrated his 90th birthday.
Randy Peterson, 57, died. He was a Nelson High School graduate and a retired as a first sergeant from the army.
Ralph Bottenfield, 101, died. He was a longtime Nelson resident.
The Crest Theatre was playing "Race to Witch Mountain" and "Monsters vs. Aliens."
One Year Ago
Convening as the county board of equalization, the Nuckolls County Board denied an application for tax exemption from the Prayer Center for the organization's Nelson facility, the former Nelson Good Samaritan Center.
Gladys Shroyer, 79, died. She was a lifelong Nuckolls County resident.
Robert Wigert, 91, died. He was a former pastor of the First United Methodist Church of Superior.
The annual Nuckolls County Health fair was held at Superior High School.
The Crest Theatre was playing "G. I. Joe: Retaliation."

To return to the top of the page and choose another story, click here.


 

Nuckolls County Courthouse News

County Court, civil
Merchants Credit Adjusters, Inc., vs. Kathleen S. Spurgin, Superior, judgment entered.
Merchants Credit Adjusters, Inc., vs. Roberto Mendoza, Superior, judgment entered.
Credit Management Services vs. Ryan Butler and Lisa Butler, Superior, judgment entered.
County Court, criminal
State of Nebraska vs. Ceciela L. Kipp, Superior, driving under suspension; $100.
State of Nebraska vs. Tracey R. Samsel, Superior, criminal trespass, 2nd degree; $250.
State of Nebraska vs. Chad A. Klingenberger, Salina, DUI .15-plus; $500, 30 days jail, license revoked for 1 year, ignition interlock permit ordered; driving during revocation; $100.
State of Nebraska vs. Michelle L. Villicano, Superior, driving during revocation; $100.
State of Nebraska vs. Michelle L. Villicano, Superior, contributing to the delinquency of a child; $500.
Real estate transfers
George F. Sund, Jr., personal representative for the Estate of George F. Sund, to James L. Sund Undivided 14 Interest in N 12 31-2-8; Undivided 14 Interest in SW 14 29-2-8.
George F. Sund, Jr., personal representative for the Estate of George F. Sund, to George F. Sund Jr. Undivided 14 Interest in N 12 31-2-8; Undivided 14 Interest in SW 14 29-2-8.
George F. Sund, Jr., personal representative for the Estate of George F. Sund, to Rosemary E. Anderson Undivided 14 Interest in N 12 31-2-8; Undivided 14 Interest in SW 14 29-2-8.
George F. Sund, Jr., personal representative for the Estate of George F. Sund, to Sharon M. Portenier Undivided 14 Interest in N 12 31-2-8; Undivided 14 Interest in SW 14 29-2-8.
Bonnie J. Eckles to Bonnie J. Eckles, trustee Lots 9 and 10 in Block 6, East Superior of Superior, Nuckolls County Nebraska; Lots 21 and 22 in Block 12, Original Town of Superior, Nuckolls County Nebraska; NE 14 14-1-5.
William J. Hubl, Patricia A. Hubl to John J. Himmelberg, Donnalene C. Himmelberg Lots 12 and 13 and Pt Lot 11 Svobodas Addtion of Lawrence.
Ruth Ann Whitmore, trustee for the Ruth Ann Whitmore Revocable Trust to 3W Capital LLC Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 in Block 12, Peter E Spurks 1st Addition to Nelson and S 12 of Vacated Third Ave.
Matthew M. Whitmore, Deborah Whitmore, Kevin A. Whitmore, Monica Whitmore, Kelvin W. Whitmore, Danelle Whitmore, Ruth Ann Whitmore to 3W Capital LLC SW 14 9-4-6.
Ruth Ann Whitmore, trustee for the Ruth Ann Whitmore Revocable Trust to 3W Capital LLC NW 14 10-4-6.
Sharon R. Greenwood to Casey's Retail Company Lot 1 and Pt Lot 2 in Block 33, Original Town of Superior.
John E. Price, Sr., to Casey's Retail Company E45 Ft Lot 3 in Block 33, Original Town of Superior.
John E. Price, Sr., to Casey's Retail Company Lot 3 in Block 33, Original Town of Superior.
Superior Development Corporation to Casey's Retail Company W98 Ft Lot 3 in Block 33, Original Town of Superior.
Superior Development Corporation to Casey's Retail Company Lot 3 in Block 33, Original Town of Superior.
Donald Sloane, Peggy Sloane to Casey's Retail Company East 70 12 Ft Lot 2 in Block 33 Original Town of Superior.
Mark A. Chapman, Cheryl L. Mellenthin, Andrew Meyer, Peggy Meyer to Darren T. Thompson, Jessica H. Thompson Parcel in NW 14 20-1-8.
Jacque L. Fitzgerald to Kenneth Keever, Bonnie Keever Lot 14 in Block 32, Original Town of Nelson.
Vernon A. Yost ­Revocable Trust, Chad Yost ­Successor Trustee to Carl Elting SW 14 28-4-6; Pt SE 14 NE 14 & Pt NE 14 SE 14.
Tabatha J. Ehlers to Jerred D. Ehlers Lot 11 in Block 27, North Superior.

To return to the top of the page and choose another story, click here.


County Board approves purchase of 4x4 backhoe tractor
The Nuckolls County Board at Monday's regular meeting gave approval for Gary Warren, county highway superintendent, to seek bids for a new four-wheel-drive backhoe tractor with front-end loader.
Warren said he looked at a Caterpillar 420, which is the type and size machine the road department needs, and the price is about $120,000. He would like to trade in the 1972 Caterpillar 930 kept at the Superior yard. He said it was only used 66 hours in the last year, because every time they need it, they have to fix something before they use it.
The board told Warren not to let it go for too little money in the trade; if he's not happy with the deal, they can take bids and sell it themselves. Warren said he looked at potential claims for the remainder of the fiscal year, which ends June 30, and Cindy Buescher, road department secretary, looked at the revenue side, and the budget will allow for the purchase.
The commissioners told Warren to prepare a specification sheet and advertise for bids. Jackie Kassebaum, county clerk, tentatively scheduled the bid-letting for May 12.
In other business:
· Warren reported the road department began working their summer hours ­­ four 10-hour days ­­ this week.
· The courthouse and other county buildings will be closed Friday for the observance of Arbor Day.
· Commissioner Dan Corman was absent from the meeting for a scheduled vacation.

To return to the top of the page and choose another story, click here.

 

Brick from Guide Rock School leads to award-winning story
A story about the history of brick factories in Hastings won third place for the Hastings Tribune in the single feature story category of the Nebraska Press Association's "better newspaper contest."
The story began when Ron Frasier, Superior, found a brick engraved with the name "John Blum," with his Hastings address. The brick had been salvaged from the demolition of the Guide Rock school.
Frasier took the brick to Donna Christensen, who dug into the story by interviewing Blum's son, sister and widow still living in Hastings, while Andy Raun from the Tribune researched the history of the brick making industry in Hastings in the early 1900s. Together they developed the story, "A Voice From The Past," which was published in February 2013, on the front page of the Tribune.

To return to the top of the page and choose another story, click here.

Nebraska News Service

Stories of statewide interest

Prepared by UNL journalism students

 

Photo ID to vote bill brings threat of lawsuit
By Demetria Stephens, Nebraska News Service
March 7, 2013
LINCOLN ­ Nebraskans want some kind of voter ID law, but a senator's second attempt to bring such a bill misses the mark, according to Secretary of State John Gale.
Larry Dix, executive director of the Nebraska Association of County Officials, read Gale's statement during Government, Military and Veterans Affairs Committee hearing on Legislative Bill 381, Thursday, March 7. The bill, introduced by Sen. Charlie Janssen of Fremont, would require Nebraskans to show a photo ID when voting. Janssen, a candidate in the 2014 governor's race, introduced a similar bill last year, which failed.
Former senator Brenda Council of Omaha said LB381 might be unconstitutional. Amy Miller, ACLU Nebraska legal director, and Adam Morfeld, the Nebraskans for Civic Reform executive director, agreed. Morfeld said his group of 27 Nebraska organizations would sue the state if the bill passes.
"Voting is a fundamental constitutional right, not only the U.S. constitution," she said. "But I urge the members of this committee and the Legislature as a whole to not forget the Nebraska Constitution."
The Nebraska constitution prohibits anything hindering a qualified voter, which is a registered voter, she said.
Thirty-three states now have voter ID laws, with one of the strictest being Indiana. Janssen based LB381 on that law. His bill would make the Department of Motor Vehicles offer a state identification card at no cost to a voters who can't afford another government photo ID. Mail ballots wouldn't require a photo ID, unless it was the person's first time voting. Anyone who doesn't provide the ID at the polls would have to cast a provisional ballot, which means voting officials have to verify the person's identity.
Janssen was amending the bill to allow election officials in rural areas to vouch for the identity of voters if they forget to bring their ID to vote. He cited a 2012 report by the Pew Center on the States that found 24 million U.S. voter registrations, or one out of eight, were no longer valid or significantly inaccurate.
"The report also found 1.8 million dead people listed as voters and 2.75 million people registered in more than one state," he said.
But because Nebraska hasn't had widespread voting fraud, Gale said the bill might not be appropriate for the state. Gale's statement was read in a neutral position. Other opponents said the bill could reduce the amount of people who vote by putting up barriers. Some groups who might be hurt included students and adopted children who might be on the move, and people who can't easily travel such as the elderly and disabled, including veterans.
Former judge Jan Gradwohl said veterans might be in homes or hospitals and not able to go to the Department of Motor Vehicle to get the ID required by this bill.
"Here are people who have fought for the right to vote and who would be themselves unable to vote," she said.
Supporter Marty Brown, vice president of Nebraska Taxpayers for Freedom, said the American flag in the hearing room reminded him of his service in the military in 1965. People spit on him when he returned from service, he said.
"We don't have any respect for that flag," he said. "In reference to LB381, we'd give some of that respect back."

 

March. 6, 2013

Tax breaks for wind energy could attract development, revenue
By Joseph Moore, Nebraska News Service
LINCOLN ­ Nebraska would become one of only two states in the country that offer tax credits for renewable energy generation under a bill introduced by Sen. Jeremy Nordquist of Omaha.
The Legislature's Revenue Committee heard testimony March 6 on LB 411.
The bill would offer a new tax incentive for solar, wind, biomass and landfill gas energy producers just as the federal tax credit on renewable energy production is set to expire at the end of 2013.
"Us having something like this in place would make us a magnet for renewable energy developers," Nordquist said. He said the tax incentive would give Nebraska a competitive advantage over other states in attracting investment in renewables.
Currently, only Oklahoma offers a production-based tax credit on renewable energy.
Despite covering several categories of renewable energy, Nordquist said the bill's goal is to attract wind developers.
Nebraska currently ranks fourth in the nation in wind resources, according to the American Wind Energy Association. The state had 260 wind turbines operating in 2012 with a total capacity of 459 megawatts, providing 2.9 percent of Nebraska's power.
By comparison, Iowa, which ranks seventh in the nation in wind resources, had a total wind energy capacity of 4,536 megawatts and generated more than 18 percent of its power from wind in 2011, according to the American Wind Energy Association.
Even with plentiful wind resources, Nebraska is falling behind neighboring states in wind energy production.
Nordquist's bill would provide a tax credit of .5 cents for each kilowatt-hour of electricity generated from a renewable source. That amount would increase to a peak of 1.5 cents between 2015 and 2017, dropping back down to .5 cents after 2019.
Producers would be eligible for the credit for up to eight years.
The estimated cost to the state for these tax credits is about $2 million for the fiscal year 2014-2015.
Sen. Paul Schumacher of Columbus asked if the tax credit is necessary to attract developers considering Nebraska's abundant wind resources.
Richard Lombardi, representing the Wind Coalition, a nonprofit group that advocates for wind energy production, responded by saying that the energy market is heavily subsidized and energy producers are forced to go where the incentives are greatest.
"Tax policy is everything in energy policy," he said.
Lombardi said the state, and particularly rural areas, would benefit from an increase in wind energy production. "Wind projects become one of the largest taxpayers," he said.
David Levy, representing Midwest Wind Energy, a wind farm development company with operations in Nebraska, agreed that the tax credit is necessary to attract more investment.
"Other states' tax incentives put Nebraska at a disadvantage," he said.
Levy said Midwest Wind Energy projects in Custer, Knox and Boone counties would generate an estimated $66 million in local and state tax revenue over the next 10 years, adding, "We would like to build more projects in Nebraska."
No one testified against the bill.
Nordquist said the committee would hear testimony on a number of related bills and encouraged members to consider some form of incentive for renewable energy development.