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THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

From our early files

Nuckolls County Courthouse News

Orphan Train program to be presented at Vestey Center

Red Cross preparing for large eclipse crowds



From our early files

Eighty Years Ago
W. H. Kalb was named manager of the Armour and Company plant in Superior.
The Nebraska Game, Forestration and Parks Commission stocked several thousand channel cat fish in the Republican River. Half were placed in the tail race and half were placed about three miles above the dam.
The Civilian Conservation Corps camp at Nelson was closed. The 50 men who were stationed there returned to Hebron.
Joseph Bray, 64, died. He was a retired farmer who resided in Superior.
Baker's cocoa was 19 cents a pound at the E. C. Washington Grocery and Market in Superior.
The Lyric Theatre was showing "Kid Galahad," starring Edward G. Robinson and Bette Davis.
Seventy Years Ago
The Superior Municipal Airport flight breakfast attracted 30 aircraft.
The eighth annual Green Plain (District 63) school picnic was held at Superior.
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Eiseman, Superior, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.
A. J. Floyd, a blind piano tuner from Beatrice, died. He tuned pianos for many years all across south central Nebraska. He was a frequent visitor to Superior. He lost one eye in a railway accident and the other when he was kicked by a horse.
A useful gift was given free for all dead stock with hides on picked up by the Superior Rendering Service.
The Lyric Theatre was showing " The Macomber Affair," starring Gregory Peck and Joan Bennett.
Sixty Years Ago
The State Railway Commission denied the application of the Burlington Railroad to discontinue passenger service on its line between Wymore and Oxford.
Service Cleaners, Superior, was sold to Mr. and Mrs. Merle Roland by Mrs. Charles Keith and Mrs. Ervin Stephens.
Sidney Coates, 72, died. He worked for the Santa Fe and Chicago and North Western railroads in Superior.
Roy Rust, 69, died. He was a Superior resident.
Halibut steaks were 49 cents per pound at the Superior Safeway.
The Crest Theatre was playing "Teahouse of the August Moon," starring Marlon Brando and Glenn Ford.
Fifty Years Ago
The Lawrence Centennial celebration parade featured 60 floats in the parade. More than 2,100 people were served at a dinner.
Dr. Jon Ayers, a veterinarian, accepted a position at Grand Island. He had been associated with the Superior Animal Hospital for four years.
Floyd Bryan retired from his post as superintendent of the Farmers Union Creamery plant in Superior with 40 years of service.
Mr. and Mrs. Gus Brazil closed their cream station on West Fourth Street ,
Ice milk was 98 cents a gallon at the Superior Safeway.
The Crest Theatre was playing "The Blue Max," starring George Peppard and James Mason.
Forty Years Ago
Dr. Phillip Taylor discontinued his Nuckolls County medical practice. He was practicing as a full-time surgeon in Las Vegas, Nev.
Minor and Sam Baird, Superior, purchased an interest in the First National Bank of Formoso.
Salaries and fringe benefits rose 9.06 per cent for Superior school faculty and administrators.
Carrie Whitmer, 81, died. She was a Webber community resident.
Watermelons were 98 cents at Superior's Ideal Market.
The Crest Theatre was playing "A Bridge Too Far," starring Dirk Bogarde and James Caan.
Thirty Years Ago
Thomas Greenlee was hired as a teacher and head football coach at Superior High School.
Albert and Edna Kroeger, Byron, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Larson, Scandia, celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary.
Leona Birdsell Topliff, 85, died. She was a Superior resident.
Seedless grapes were 58 cents per pound at Superior's Jack and Jill Food Center.
The Crest Theatre was showing "The Living Daylights."
Twenty Years Ago
Nathan Michals, Davenport, built 21 street signs and installed them in the Village of Oak as part of his Eagle Scout project. It was the first time Oak had street signs.
The Superior Chamber of Commerce completed its move to the former Carnegie Library building.
A study commissioned by the City of Superior to determine a drainage improvement plan for Lincoln Park cited a cost of $123,000.
Dale and Ruby Burge, Webber, celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary.
The Crest Theatre was playing "My Best Friend's Wedding," starring Julia Roberts and "Good Burger."
Ten Years Ago
Nuckolls County was the owner of 25 structurally deficient bridges.
The Nuckolls County Historical Society took steps to initiate the levy authority approved by voters in 2002.
James Groleau was installed as vicar at Centennial Lutheran Church Superior, and St. Mark's Lutheran Church, Ruskin.
Superior school enrollment was 418 students, a decline of 12 students from the previous year.
The Crest Theatre was playing "The Simpsons Movie."
Five Years Ago
The former Florea hospital building was demolished a part of the Superior City Auditorium renewal project.
Lauren Isaacson and Luke Chadwell began their teaching duties at Superior Elementary School.
The Superior school system reported 424 students enrolled.
Geraldine Nelson Hineline, 95, died. She was a Davenport resident.
The Crest Theatre was playing 'Total recall" and "The Dark Knight Rises."
One Year Ago
The footbridge crossing Lost Creek which connected the school campus with Brodstone Memorial Field was closed over safety concerns.
A soil testing crew was in Superior to obtain samples of soil and ground water at the site of a former service station.
More than 132 tons of tires were collected at a tire recycling event in Nelson.
Donald Cacek, 92, died. He was a Superior resident.
The Crest Theatre was showing "Ice Age: Collision Course."

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Nuckolls County Courthouse News


County Court, traffic
Speeding: Tommie L. Hockenberry, Hastings, $75; Ryan S. Fulton, Lincoln, $10; Benjamin L. Trausch, Bladen, $25; Anastasia R. Wagner, Glenvil, $25; Alison S. Martin, Grand Island, $75; Keenan J. White, Hastings, $200; Cindy Sibert, Superior, $75; Tyler W. Johnson, Edgar, $75.
Ryan G. Koehler, Edgar, speeding, $25; failure to use seatbelt, $25.
James Allen Lang, Hastings, overweight single axle or group of axles by 5,300 pounds, $325.
Josh G. Thompson, Hastings, no valid registration, $25.
County Court, civil
General Collection Co. vs. Jeffery A. Combs and Brenda Combs, Superior, judgment entered.
Kenny's Lumber and Farm Supply, Inc., vs. Barbara Jeffs, Nelson, judgment entered.
Credit Management Services, Inc., vs. Jessica Sanders, Superior, judgment entered.
County Court, criminal
State of Nebraska vs. Victoria W. Lehmann, Deshler, issuing bad check $500 or less, four counts, $100.
District Court, criminal
State of Nebraska vs. James A. Harrington, Superior, attempted forgery in the 2nd degree, 60 days in jail.
Marriages
Christopher Adam Boehle and Stevie Lynn Crookshanks were married Aug. 5 in Oak by Nuckolls County Court clerk-magistrate Diana Wehrman, with Seth McClure and Carli Cloet as witnesses
Brandon Louis Siegel and Madison Taylor Lee were married on Aug. 5 at St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Superior by Father Brad Zitek, with Blake Siegel and Erin Miller as witnesses
Adam James Theer and Lauren Marie Jasch were married Aug. 5 at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Lawrence by Father Tom Schultes, with Joe Theer and Mallaree DeVan as witnesses
Real estate transfers
Kathleen R. Thompson ­Deceased to Glen E. Thompson ­Deceased, Lot 5 and Pt Lot 4 Peddicords Sub of Lots 7 and 8 Block 20 North Superior; Pt Lots 3 and 4 Peddicords Sub of Lots 7 and 8 Block 20 North Superior.
Maureen Betts, Merlin Betts to Superior Development Corporation, Their Interest in Lot 5 and Pt Lot 4 Peddicords Sub of Lots 7 and 8 Block 20 North Superior; their Interest in Pt Lots 3 and 4 Peddicords Sub of Lots 7 and 8 Block 20 North Superior.
Jessie M. Thompson to Superior Development Corporation Their Interest in Lot 5 and Pt Lot 4 Peddicords Sub of Lots 7 and 8 Block 20 North Superior ; their Interest in Pt Lots 3 and 4 Peddicords Sub of Lots 7 and 8 Block 20 North Superior.
Peggy Foshee to Superior Development Corporation Their Interest in Lot 5 and Pt Lot 4 Peddicords Sub of Lots 7 and 8 Block 20 North Superior; their Interest in Pt Lots 3 and 4 Peddicords Sub of Lots 7 and 8 Block 20 North Superior.
Glenda Thompson to Superior Development Corporation her Interest in Lot 5 and Pt Lot 4 Peddicords Sub of Lots 7 and 8 Block 20 North Superior; her Interest in Pt Lots 3 and 4 Peddicords Sub of Lots 7 and 8 Block 20 North Superior.
Charles Thompson to Superior Development Corporation his Interest in Lot 5 and Pt Lot 4 Peddicords Sub of Lots 7 and 8 Block 20 North Superior; his Interest in Pt Lots 3 and 4 Peddicords Sub of Lots 7 and 8 Block 20 North Superior.
Superior Properties, LLC, to ARCA Investments LLC Lot 7 in Block 3, Second Highland Estates-Quy Sub of Superior.
Jessica D. Hughes, Bobby Hughes to Cynthia A. Luben Lot 3 in Block 15, Blks 13-16, sub of Outlots A and B of Oak.
Nicholas Kucera, Alexandrea Kucera to Douglas A. Schuldt Lot 6 in Block 10, Original Town of Lawrence.
Honradez Investment Group, LLC to Brent Terwey Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 and Pt Lots 9, 10, 11 and 12 and Vacated Streets and Alleys in Block 6 Original Town of Mt. Clare; Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, 17 and18 and Vacated Streets and Alleys in Block 7, Original Town of Mt. Clare; Lots 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24 and Vacated Streets and Alleys in Block 8, Original Town of Mt. Clare; Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24 and Vacated Streets and Alleys in Block 13, Original Town of Mt. Clare; Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 and Vacated Streets and Alleys in Block 14, Original Town of Mt. Clare.
Brooke Bauer, Terron Bauer to Adam E. Sunday, Kristin M. Sunday Lot 15 in Block 36, Original Town of Superior.
Wells Fargo Bank, NA, to Angela Danielle Teague Lot 10 in Block 14, North Superior.

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Orphan Train program will be presented at Vestey Center
"Riders of the Orphan Train," a one-hour, multimedia program will be presented at the Vestey Center in Superior at 3 p.m. on Aug. 30. The program will be held in the dining room and is free and open to the public.
The program is sponsored by the Superior Public Library, Humanities Nebraska and the Nebraska Cultural Endowment. Grant funding was provided to bring the program to underserved areas of the state. Presentations are also planned in Red Cloud, Beatrice and Crete.
The Orphan Train was part of the largest child migration in history. Between 1854 and 1929, more than 250,000 orphans and unwanted children were taken out of New York City and given away at train stations across America, many of them in Nebraska. Between 1861 and 1925, more than 4,000 children from the trains made their homes in our state in such towns as North Platte, Lexington, Broadwater, Elkhorn, West Point, Neligh and many others.
"Riders of the Orphan Train" is the official educational outreach program of the National Orphan Train Complex, Museum and Research Center in Concordia and has toured nationally since 1998. The program combines original music by Phillip Lancaster, video montages of historic photographs and interviews with survivors and dramatic readings from the novel, Riders on the Orphan Train, by Alison Moore. Although the program is about children, it is designed to engage audiences of all ages and to inform, inspire and raise awareness about this little-known part of history.
This "placing out" system was originally organized by Methodist minister Charles Loring Brace and the Children's Aid Society of New York. His mission was to rid the streets and overcrowded orphanages of homeless children and provide them with an opportunity to find new homes. Many of the children were not orphans but "surrendered" by parents too impoverished to keep them. The New York Foundling Hospital, a Catholic organization, also sent out children to be placed in Catholic homes. The 76-year experiment in child relocation is filled with the entire spectrum of human emotion and reveals a great deal about the successes and failures of the American Dream.
Alison Moore is a former assistant professor of English and creative writing in the MFA program at the University of Arizona. She lives in Austin, Texas, and is a current humanities scholar. She published her novel, Riders on the Orphan Train, with a fiction fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and a grant from the Texas Institute of Letters. She is the author of three other books and in 2012 received the Charles Loring Brace Award for helping to preserve the history of the Orphan Trains.
Phillip Lancaster was born in Texarkana, Texas, and studied music and art at L'Ecole De Beaux Arts in Angers, France. While in France, he toured and recorded with a bluegrass band and also worked as a stage technician for theatrical productions. After returning to the U.S., he was a founding member of the acoustic quartet, "Still on the Hill." In 2007, he received an Arkansas Arts Council fellowship for music composition. He currently lives in Austin and also received the Charles Loring Brace Award in 2012.
Created in 1973 as a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Humanities Nebraska is an independent, nonprofit organization governed by a volunteer board of public and academic members. They fund programs that explore Nebraska heritage, build community awareness and strengthen ties to cultural traditions. The Nebraska Cultural Endowment is a public-private partnership that designates funds to Humanities Nebraska for distribution.

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Red Cross preparing for large eclipse crowds
Millions of people are making travel plans to see the first solar eclipse visible in this country in 99 years, and the American Red Cross is prepared to help them if needed. It is estimated that more than seven million people are expected to travel to the 70-mile wide viewing area from Oregon to South Carolina ­­ many of them coming to Nebraska, since the path touches the entire state. Regional Red Cross officials are coordinating with local emergency agencies along the state's viewing path to ensure that any contingency can be handled.
"As with any large public event, we have increased our level of preparedness so that we can move quickly if needed," said Rachelle Lipker, executive director for the American Red Cross in central and western Nebraska. "Planning is a standard part of our regular collaborations with local emergency management officials and we are always ready to shelter and feed people affected by disasters, if requested."
The Red Cross has hundreds of emergency shelters in the 12 states in the eclipse path in case of other emergencies, such as severe weather and extreme heat that might occur while travelers are away from home. Supplies such as cots, blankets and water are already pre-positioned across Nebraska. Red Cross volunteers and other resources are on standby in case they are needed.
"Cellular service could be impacted by the large number of people visiting the region," added Lipker. "If networks go down, the Red Cross will use ham radio or top-priority emergency cell channels to communicate."
People coming to see the eclipse need to be prepared, and the Red Cross offers these safety tips to keep in mind:
· Pack an emergency kit in case you get stuck in traffic or can't find a place to stay. Include water, non-perishable food, a flashlight, battery-powered radio, first aid kit, medications, supplies for an infant if applicable, a multi-purpose tool, personal hygiene items including toilet paper, cell phone chargers, extra cash, blankets, maps of the area and emergency contact information.
· Be informed. Learn how officials contact people in the area you are planning to visit in case of an emergency.
· Let family or friends know where you are going and the route you plan to take to get there.
· Arrive at where you plan to watch the eclipse at least a day ahead of time. Heavy traffic congestion is anticipated on major highways before and after the eclipse event.
· Keep your gas tank at least half full so you don't run out of gas while stuck in traffic.
· Severe weather can occur quickly in Nebraska. Check the weather forecast ahead of time and throughout the day.
· Dress appropriately so you can adjust for changes in weather conditions. It could be very hot.
· Create an emergency plan. Determine a location to meet in case someone gets separated from your group, and where to go if severe weather occurs.
· Because cell service may be overwhelmed, print out your directions. Cellular service can be spotty in some areas, so a road map may also be helpful.
· Know where you're staying at night. Hotel rooms along the eclipse route are mostly sold out, and rentals are extremely high in some cities. Plan to camp if necessary, but be aware that campgrounds requiring reservations are mostly full already.
· When viewing the eclipse, remember, looking directly at the sun is unsafe. For steps to take to observe a solar eclipse safely, please refer to information from NASA at https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety.

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