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THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS

From our early files

Nuckolls County Courthouse News

Seniors are popular among scammers

Robots may have place in health care

Scroll to the bottom of this page for stories from the Nebraska News Service


From our early files

Eighty Years Ago
Mr. and Mrs. J. Oscar Moore, Oak, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.
W. A. Blauvelt began construction of new gasoline station southwest of Superior.
Randall Ford became the owner of the Superior Journal. The former publisher of the Plainville, Kan., Times purchased the paper at auction.
The dog which bit an eight year old boy in Angus tested positive for rabies and the boy was undergoing treatment.
Fresh oysters, extra standard, were 45 cents per quart at Cecil Reid's Superior grocery store.
The Lyric Theatre was showing "Caravan" and the Doris Davison Revue was fast, snappy and classy with their live performance.
Seventy Years Ago
Beavers were building a dam just east of Highway 14 at the Kansas-Nebraska line.
Mr. and Mrs. Orie Goodrich, Nora, celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary.
Jensene Bock Jorgensen, 74, died. She was a long time Ruskin resident.
More than 45 friends and neighbors gathered for a husking bee in the Cadams community at the farm of Mrs. A. W. Andersen. They delivered the harvested 60 acres of corn to the Cadams elevator.
Sherwin-Williams Mar-Not varnish was $1.53 cents per quart at Barnard's Drug Store in Superior.
The Crest Theatre was showing "Are These Our Parents," starring Helen Vinson and Lyle Talbot.
Sixty Years Ago
Superior firemen easily extinguished an out of control rubbish fire at the home of Val Heim.
Dudley Gray, former manager of Superior's Hotel Dudley, was named as manager of the Greenlee Hotel, Madison.
Gladys Stephenson, a Guide Rock school teacher, was seriously injured when her car collided with a Burlington freight train near Rosemont on Highway 78.
Dr. Edward's Olive Tablets were 23 cents per package at Superior's Chard Drug Store.
The Crest Theatre was playing "Susan Slept Here," starring Dick Powell and Debbie Reynolds.
Fifty Years Ago
An open house was held at the new Superior High School. More than 1,200 visitors toured the facility.
Mr. and Mrs. Myrl Meehan, Superior, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.
A. Dean Gaskill, Northwestern depot agent in Superior for 20 years, retired after 46 years of service with the railroad.
Dale Campbell, 51, died. He was a retired Ideal Cement Plant worker and a Superior resident,
Swift's Royal Rock tom turkeys were 33 cents per pound at the Superior Cash-Way Market.
The Crest Theatre was showing "Zulu."
Forty Years Ago
The waste pre-treatment plant at the Superior plant of Mid-America dairymen was phased into operation.
A combine owned by Ronald Higer caught fire and suffered an estimated $8,000 in damage.
The Great Plains Railway raised $70,000 to avoid a cash shortfall while awaiting the installation of a bridge over the Little Blue River at Oak.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Thomas, Superior, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.
Hen turkeys were 53 cents per pound at the Superior Safeway.
The Crest Theatre was playing "Walking Tall."
Thirty Years Ago
Vandals broke several windows at the 2R School located along U.S. Highway 136 northwest of Superior.
Schonscheck Motors was appointed as the Ford and Mercury franchise dealer in Superior.
Lillie Dusatko Karmazin, 82, died. She was a longtime resident of the Lawrence community.
Roland Norman, 73, died. He was a Guide Rock resident and the owner and operator of the R. A. Norman Lumberyard.
A Stihl Wood Boss chain saw was $299 at Superior Outdoor Power Center.
The Crest Theatre was playing "Irreconcilable Differences."
Twenty Years Ago
Mr. and Mrs. Wylie Blair, Superior, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.
The first snowfall of the season was observed but quickly melted.
Verna Herr Kruse, 76, died. She was a longtime Nelson resident.
Geneva Shanks Garton, 86 died. She was a longtime Webber resident.
A 10 bag of russet potatoes was 88 cents at Superior's Jack and Jill Food Center.
The Crest Theatre was playing "Quiz Show" and "Squanto: A Warriors Tale."
Ten Years Ago
Lane and Anna Hawley changed the name of their drug store from Menke Drug to Superior Pharmacy.
The Nuckolls County Commissioners agreed to purchase a building and relocate the Nuckolls County Extension office from the county courthouse.
Clifford and Ginger White, Superior, celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary.
Elsie Kuhlmann Meyer, 87, died. She was a longtime Superior resident and worked at Ideal Market for 37 years.
The Crest Theatre was playing "National Treasure" and "Shall We Dance?"
Five Years Ago
A human skull, not of Native American origin, was found near the Republican River southwest of Superior.
Agnes Drudik, Superior, celebrated her 95th birthday.
Orlin Bargen, Superior, celebrated his 87th birthday.
Richard Elliott, 79, died. He was a Superior resident and retired from the City of Superior as city utility manager and planner.
The Crest Theatre was playing "Couples Retreat" and "Planet 51."
One Year Ago
USDA Rural Development awarded $10,200 to the Nuckolls County Agricultural Society, Inc., The funds were used to replace wooden bleachers at the rodeo arena and repair the leaking roof of the 4-H building at the county fairgrounds.
Esther Renz, Superior, and Andy Jensen, Guide Rock, celebrated their 80th birthdays.
Elizabeth Headrick was named as the senior living manager at Superior's Victorian Legacy, an assisted living facility.
Eldrick Grummert, 88, died. He was a farmer and a longtime 4-H leader in Nuckolls County.
The Crest Theatre was playing "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire."

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Nuckolls County Courthouse News

COUNTY COURT, TRAFFIC, SPEEDING:
Kevin J. Ostdiek, Deshler, $25; Tammy R. Minnis, Oak Grove, MO, $25; Dustin A. Garrison, Beatrice, $75; John R. Clark, Tulsa, OK, $25; Kelly S. Whitney, Hastings, $75; Eric Dewayne Boyd, Lincoln, $25
OTHER TRAFFIC:
Jerald J. Davis, Omaha, Improper stopping; $10
COUNTY COURT, CIVIL:
Credit Management Services v. Timothy Glass, Oak; Judgment Entered
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS:
Ronald Ullrich to Kate Brown, Debora Brown Lot 11, 12 in Block 26, Original Town of Nelson, Nuckolls County Nebraska
Equivest Financial, LLC to Green Light Real Estate Investment, LLC Lot 8 in Block 23, East Superior of Superior, Nuckolls County Nebraska
Vicki O. Pusateria to Richard T. Pusateri, Public Lot 2 in Block 1, Highland Estates-Quy Sub of Superior, Nuckolls County Nebraska
John P. Schriever to Timothy D. Blecha, Laveta K. Blecha Pt Lot 1C, 2A in Block 1, Hewetts Addition of Superior, Nuckolls County Nebraska; Lot 7A, 8C in Block 1, Guthries Sub of Blk 1 & Lot 1-6 in Blk 2 of Hunters 1st Addition of Superior, Nuckolls County Nebraska; Lot 7B in Block 1, Guthries Sub of Blk 1 & Lot 1-6 in Blk 2 of Hunters 1st Addition of Superior, Nuckolls County Nebraska
Andrew Dean Schriever to Timothy D. Blecha, Laveta K. Blecha Pt Lot 1C, 2A in Block 1, Hewetts Addition of Superior, Nuckolls County Nebraska; Lot 7A, 8C in Block 1, Guthries Sub of Blk 1 & Lot 1-6 in Blk 2 of Hunters 1st Addition of Superior, Nuckolls County Nebraska; Lot 7B in Block 1, Guthries Sub of Blk 1 & Lot 1-6 in Blk 2 of Hunters 1st Addition of Superior, Nuckolls County Nebraska
Domenica C. Mickelson to Timothy D. Blecha, Laveta K. Blecha Pt Lot 1C, 2A in Block 1, Hewetts Addition of Superior, Nuckolls County Nebraska; Lot 7A, 8C in Block 1, Guthries Sub of Blk 1 & Lot 1-6 in Blk 2 of Hunters 1st Addition of Superior, Nuckolls County Nebraska; Lot 7B in Block 1, Guthries Sub of Blk 1 & Lot 1-6 in Blk 2 of Hunters 1st Addition of Superior, Nuckolls County Nebraska

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Seniors are popular among scammers
The bad guys think the elderly have significant access to money. They may have gotten that wrong but, nevertheless, the scammers view seniors as easy targets, according to the Association of Mature American Citizens.
It's gotten so bad, says AMAC, that the National Council on Aging has posted a warning on its Web site listing the "Top 10 Scams Targeting Seniors." They include Medicare fraud where they pose as representatives of the agency to steal personal information. Another favorite is foisting counterfeit drugs on them via phony Internet pharmacies.
But, said the NCOA, "perhaps the most common scheme is when scammers use fake telemarketing calls to prey on older people, who as a group make twice as many purchases over the phone than the national average."

 

 

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Robots may have place in health care
We may have robots to take care of us in the not-so-distant future, according to the Association of Mature American Citizens.
In fact, Louise Aronson, an associate professor of geriatrics at the University of California at San Francisco, recently made the case for automatons as care-givers in a New York Times Op Ed article. She noted that researchers around the world are developing computer-based practitioners.
There are skeptics who argue that machines cannot replace humans, but Aronson said "the biggest argument for robot caregivers is that we need them. We do not have anywhere near enough human caregivers for the growing number of older Americans."
It'll be some time, if ever, for android nurses to be accepted, says AMAC. But, in the meantime the quest goes on. In Japan, they are building robots that can provide basic nursing chores. In Europe, they are developing a machine that has human features and a built-in touch screen computer. And, in Sweden they are designing one that can allow doctors to make virtual house calls.

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Nebraska News Service

Stories of statewide interest

Prepared by UNL journalism students

 

Photo ID to vote bill brings threat of lawsuit
By Demetria Stephens, Nebraska News Service
March 7, 2013
LINCOLN ­ Nebraskans want some kind of voter ID law, but a senator's second attempt to bring such a bill misses the mark, according to Secretary of State John Gale.
Larry Dix, executive director of the Nebraska Association of County Officials, read Gale's statement during Government, Military and Veterans Affairs Committee hearing on Legislative Bill 381, Thursday, March 7. The bill, introduced by Sen. Charlie Janssen of Fremont, would require Nebraskans to show a photo ID when voting. Janssen, a candidate in the 2014 governor's race, introduced a similar bill last year, which failed.
Former senator Brenda Council of Omaha said LB381 might be unconstitutional. Amy Miller, ACLU Nebraska legal director, and Adam Morfeld, the Nebraskans for Civic Reform executive director, agreed. Morfeld said his group of 27 Nebraska organizations would sue the state if the bill passes.
"Voting is a fundamental constitutional right, not only the U.S. constitution," she said. "But I urge the members of this committee and the Legislature as a whole to not forget the Nebraska Constitution."
The Nebraska constitution prohibits anything hindering a qualified voter, which is a registered voter, she said.
Thirty-three states now have voter ID laws, with one of the strictest being Indiana. Janssen based LB381 on that law. His bill would make the Department of Motor Vehicles offer a state identification card at no cost to a voters who can't afford another government photo ID. Mail ballots wouldn't require a photo ID, unless it was the person's first time voting. Anyone who doesn't provide the ID at the polls would have to cast a provisional ballot, which means voting officials have to verify the person's identity.
Janssen was amending the bill to allow election officials in rural areas to vouch for the identity of voters if they forget to bring their ID to vote. He cited a 2012 report by the Pew Center on the States that found 24 million U.S. voter registrations, or one out of eight, were no longer valid or significantly inaccurate.
"The report also found 1.8 million dead people listed as voters and 2.75 million people registered in more than one state," he said.
But because Nebraska hasn't had widespread voting fraud, Gale said the bill might not be appropriate for the state. Gale's statement was read in a neutral position. Other opponents said the bill could reduce the amount of people who vote by putting up barriers. Some groups who might be hurt included students and adopted children who might be on the move, and people who can't easily travel such as the elderly and disabled, including veterans.
Former judge Jan Gradwohl said veterans might be in homes or hospitals and not able to go to the Department of Motor Vehicle to get the ID required by this bill.
"Here are people who have fought for the right to vote and who would be themselves unable to vote," she said.
Supporter Marty Brown, vice president of Nebraska Taxpayers for Freedom, said the American flag in the hearing room reminded him of his service in the military in 1965. People spit on him when he returned from service, he said.
"We don't have any respect for that flag," he said. "In reference to LB381, we'd give some of that respect back."

 

March. 6, 2013

Tax breaks for wind energy could attract development, revenue
By Joseph Moore, Nebraska News Service
LINCOLN ­ Nebraska would become one of only two states in the country that offer tax credits for renewable energy generation under a bill introduced by Sen. Jeremy Nordquist of Omaha.
The Legislature's Revenue Committee heard testimony March 6 on LB 411.
The bill would offer a new tax incentive for solar, wind, biomass and landfill gas energy producers just as the federal tax credit on renewable energy production is set to expire at the end of 2013.
"Us having something like this in place would make us a magnet for renewable energy developers," Nordquist said. He said the tax incentive would give Nebraska a competitive advantage over other states in attracting investment in renewables.
Currently, only Oklahoma offers a production-based tax credit on renewable energy.
Despite covering several categories of renewable energy, Nordquist said the bill's goal is to attract wind developers.
Nebraska currently ranks fourth in the nation in wind resources, according to the American Wind Energy Association. The state had 260 wind turbines operating in 2012 with a total capacity of 459 megawatts, providing 2.9 percent of Nebraska's power.
By comparison, Iowa, which ranks seventh in the nation in wind resources, had a total wind energy capacity of 4,536 megawatts and generated more than 18 percent of its power from wind in 2011, according to the American Wind Energy Association.
Even with plentiful wind resources, Nebraska is falling behind neighboring states in wind energy production.
Nordquist's bill would provide a tax credit of .5 cents for each kilowatt-hour of electricity generated from a renewable source. That amount would increase to a peak of 1.5 cents between 2015 and 2017, dropping back down to .5 cents after 2019.
Producers would be eligible for the credit for up to eight years.
The estimated cost to the state for these tax credits is about $2 million for the fiscal year 2014-2015.
Sen. Paul Schumacher of Columbus asked if the tax credit is necessary to attract developers considering Nebraska's abundant wind resources.
Richard Lombardi, representing the Wind Coalition, a nonprofit group that advocates for wind energy production, responded by saying that the energy market is heavily subsidized and energy producers are forced to go where the incentives are greatest.
"Tax policy is everything in energy policy," he said.
Lombardi said the state, and particularly rural areas, would benefit from an increase in wind energy production. "Wind projects become one of the largest taxpayers," he said.
David Levy, representing Midwest Wind Energy, a wind farm development company with operations in Nebraska, agreed that the tax credit is necessary to attract more investment.
"Other states' tax incentives put Nebraska at a disadvantage," he said.
Levy said Midwest Wind Energy projects in Custer, Knox and Boone counties would generate an estimated $66 million in local and state tax revenue over the next 10 years, adding, "We would like to build more projects in Nebraska."
No one testified against the bill.
Nordquist said the committee would hear testimony on a number of related bills and encouraged members to consider some form of incentive for renewable energy development.